RAW RANKED SITES ABOUT
#INTERNAL COLLABORATION

The most comprehensive list of internal collaboration websites last updated on Nov 1 2019.
Stats collected from various trackers included with free apps.
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Workplace by Facebook: A Work Collaboration Tool Discover Workplace, an online team collaboration tool using Facebook features for work. Communicate within your company through a familiar interface with Workplace by Facebook.
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Wipster – The new way to review and collaborate on videos Media and post-production professionals rely on Wipster for faster creative collaboration and review across clients and internal teams
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Easy Company Intranet & Wiki Software | Papyrs Build a modern simple intranet or internal wiki site for your company in seconds with our easy web-based software. Get organized with a central knowledge base and internal website.
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testimonialAsset 1 We offer the #1 employee communications app for mobile workplace collaboration. Reach your entire workforce with all the employee engagement tools you need in one internal communications platform. Optimized for non-desk workers, Beekeeper’s digital workplace app integrates multiple operational systems and communication channels in one secure hub that is accessible from desktop and mobile devices. Our software is trusted by business leaders in over 130 countries!
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Project Management Software, Tools, and Applications for Online Collaboration | TeamWork Live TeamWork Live is the leading web-based online project management software and collaboration tool for managing internal and client projects.
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BlogIn - Create and run an internal company blog! Share internal news and knowledge, boost team collaboration and improve overall internal communication. Start 14 day FREE trial!
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Signal Kit - Smart tools. Effective Communication. Signal Kit is the complete communication suite for your K-12 community: cloud-based mass communication, internal collaboration and oversight.
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Free PMI-ACP Exam Practice Questions, Study Tips, Training and Courseware. We Provide Real World Agile Training, Specifically for Software Development Projects. We provide real world agile training, specifically for software development projects. And we guaranteed you’ll pass the PMI-ACP Agile Certification Exam on your first try if you learn the concepts provided in our collection of practice questions, study material and course ware. Our Free PMI ACP Training site is designed to point you in the right direction as to where you should focus your study effort, and exactly what you need to know to pass the exam.
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MDX Technology | Real-Time Market Data Distribution MDX Technology. Real-time market data solutions for internal data sharing, external data contributions, Excel users and Application Developers in the Financial Services, Commodities & Energy and Other sectors.
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IT CAME FROM… – Retro & Pop-Culture Insights from David Weiner, Nostalgia Curator. Retro & Pop-Culture Insights from David Weiner, Nostalgia Curator.
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XfilesPro | Salesforce External File Storage & Collaboration Solution XfilesPro is a Salesforce external file storage and collaboration solution which can help you store Salesforce files and attachments in an external storage system such as Amazon S3, Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox or any Internal System.
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Welcome to Friendershub - Social collaboration platform Friendershub Connections has been developed to provide a flexible social collaboration platform that allows peoples to effectively connect networks of specialists and internal peoples by creating ''communities'' in which they can share expertise, current activities and experiences. Friendershub Connections enables true collaboration to occur thereby helping peoples make connections and provide exceptional services.
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LFA Lawson-Fisher Associates P. C. (LFA) has been providing engineering services from its South Bend office to both public and private clients in a variety of engineering service areas for over 45 years. LFA offers a broad range of civil engineering project services principally focused in the areas of water resources, transportation, bridges and structures. We have extensive design and project management experience on a vast array of City and County projects. We have an exceptional level of experience and expertise upon which our prepared plans and recommendations are based. Our superior work across diverse client markets offer cost-effective, innovative solutions to meet the clients’ present and long term needs.  We understand the value of collaboration and realize on complex, larger projects that we will solicit the technical expertise of our project partners. Their particular expertise in certain areas compliments LFA in the interest of providing the best possible services for the client’s needs. LFA has a highly qualified and dedicated team of professionals working together to achieve a common goal of providing high-quality services to our clients as noted by our 94% repeat service record. We partner with our clients to develop long-term relationships, get to know their businesses and objectives and advocate their interest to meet client expectations. We’ve earned our clients trust by providing a consistently high level of professionalism and quality. Constantly striving to offer solutions that are often creative and are always effective. Understanding project constraints, clear lines of communication, and engagement with individual professionals involved in helping define the client’s needs and scope are key tasks for a successful project and outcomes. Constant contact with project partners and regular reports to the client is an essential task. This participative process is a key element to LFA’s success through the design development process. LFA project managers and supporting team in project partners have the technical experience and resources to coordinate the many parallel tasks to deliver the project. LFA designs optimal solutions to bring quality projects to completion safely, on schedule and within budget.
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play We offer the #1 employee communications app for mobile workplace collaboration. Reach your entire workforce with all the employee engagement tools you need in one internal communications platform. Optimized for non-desk workers, Beekeeper’s digital workplace app integrates multiple operational systems and communication channels in one secure hub that is accessible from desktop and mobile devices. Our software is trusted by business leaders in over 130 countries!
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Home - NadiELabs NadiELabs is an US based software product development and services company having development and delivery center in Chennai, India. We specialize in building next generation collaboration solutions for enterprse to improve internal communication and process management. We build business automation, process management and intelligence solution using Microsoft and other technologies for enterprises.
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Home | International Journal of Electronics Communication and Computer Engineering (TM) International, Journal,Computer Science, Engineering, Information, Technology, Electronics, Communication, Electrical, Telecommunication, Mechanical, Simulation,Civil,Submission , VLSI , MatLab, Programing,International Journal of Engineering Innovation and Research, artificial intelligence,soft computing, Electronics engineering,Computer Engineering, Electronics and Communication, Call for Papers, electronics journal, electrical and electronics engineering, journal electronic, electronic and electrical engineering, journal of electrical engineering, electrical & electronics engineering, journal of electronics, international journal of electronics, electronics & communication engineering journal, journals electronics, journal of electrical and electronics engineering, international journal of electrical engineering, journal electronics, journal of electronics and communication, international journal of electrical, electronics communication engineering journal, international journal of electrical and electronics engineering, journals of electronics, international journal of electronics engineering, computer science journal, computer science journals, journal of computer science, journal computer science, journal of computer science and technology, theoretical computer science journal, journals of computer science, journals in computer science, international journal of computer science, international journal computer science, journal of computer science and engineering, international journal of computer science and engineering, list of computer science journals, international journals in computer science, international journals on computer science, international journal of computer science and applications, list of journals in computer science, international journal of computer science engineering, international journal of computer applications, list of international journals in computer science, list journals computer science, Computer Engineering, information technology journal, journal of information technology, information technology journals, Electronics Communication, journal of information technology education, journals of information technology, Information technology Journal, information technology journals in india
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Colibo | Intranet Software and Team Collaboration Tools Use Colibo''s intranet software as your enterprise collaboration platform to increase productivity, drive employee engagement and better internal communications.
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Splashmetrics: Buyer Journey Intelligence Splashmetrics helps B2B marketers plan, visualize, automate, execute, manage, and measure the smart content funnel at the core of the Buyer Journey.
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CPM | Home An international professional services firm. CPM provides multi-jurisdictional fiduciary and administration services to private, corporate and institutional clients. The firm was founded in Cyprus in 1996 and now employs almost 90 people in offices located in Nicosia, Larnaca, Limassol and Paphos. Through a number of strategic collaboration agreements in Cyprus and abroad we provide international expertise in many jurisdictions. CPM is a privately owned independent service provider. Our approach is relationship-driven which is why many of our clients have been with us for many years. We are fostering an internal culture of co-operation and teamwork across service groups to ensure an integrated service to our clients.
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tags, tags, hyperlink tags and alt tags. Document-level key phrase factors such as the inclusion of key phrases in the domain and document file name. Competitor benchmarking The first stage of competitor benchmarking is to identify your online competitor types for search traffic. Competitors for particular key phrases are not necessarily your traditional competitors. For example, for a mobile phone retailer, when someone searches for a product, you will be competing for search visibility with these types of websites: Retailers. Network providers. Handset manufacturers. Affiliates and partner sites. Media-owned sites. Blogs and personal sites about mobile phone technology. To assess the extent that search strategy should focus on SEO and PPC (and also to be able to compete with these different types of content providers) it is necessary to assess the relative strength of these sources, as well as the various approaches to SEM they use. Try to identify competitors who have optimized their sites most effectively. Retailers trying to compete on particular product phrases in the organic listings may find that it is very difficult, since handset and network providers will often feature prominently in the natural listings because of their scale (see also Mike Grehan’s „rich-get-richer‟ argument, for explanations on why top Google results can become happily entrenched in their positions). Meanwhile, many media-owned sites and blogs can feature highly in the natural listings, because content is king. This isn’t at all surprising, given the search robots‟ love of text. Retailers tend to display big conversion-friendly images and lists of features / specifications, which may be less attractive content as far as Googlebot is concerned, if more appealing to visitors. With all this in mind, it seems obvious that many retail e-commerce managers favor PPC. More likely, it is about short-term (versus long-term) goals. Or, maybe it is just a case of easy versus difficult. The second stage of competitor analysis is to compare their relative performance. Competitors can be compared in a number of ways using tools that are freely available within the search engines or using paid for software or services. So how can I benchmark performance against competitors? 1. Ranking Position report Compare the relative performance in the natural listings for different keyphrase types, eg generic / qualified. Pay per click (PPC) Pay per click (PPC) is an Internet advertising model used on websites, where advertisers pay their host only when their ad is clicked. With search engines, advertisers typically bid on keyword phrases relevant to their target market. Content sites commonly charge a fixed price per click rather than use a bidding system. Cost per click (CPC) is the sum paid by an advertiser to search engines and other Internet publishers for a single click on their advertisement which directs one visitor to the advertiser''s website. In contrast to the generalized portal, which seeks to drive a high volume of traffic to one site, PPC implements the so-called affiliate model, that provides purchase opportunities wherever people may be surfing. It does this by offering financial incentives (in the form of a percentage of revenue) to affiliated partner sites. The affiliates provide purchase-point click-through to the merchant. It is a pay-for-performance model: If an affiliate does not generate sales, it represents no cost to the merchant. Variations include banner exchange, pay-per-click, and revenue sharing programs. Websites that utilize PPC ads will display an advertisement when a keyword query matches an advertiser''s keyword list, or when a content site displays relevant content. Such advertisements are called sponsored links or sponsored ads, and appear adjacent to or above organic results on search engine results pages, or anywhere a web developer chooses on a content site. Among PPC providers, Google AdWords, Yahoo! Search Marketing, and Microsoft ad Center are the three largest network operators, and all three operate under a bid-based model. Cost per click (CPC) varies depending on the search engine and the level of competition for a particular keyword. The PPC advertising model is open to abuse through click fraud, although Google and others have implemented automated systems to guard against abusive clicks by competitors or corrupt web developers. Determining cost per click There are two primary models for determining cost per click: flat-rate and bid-based. In both cases the advertiser must consider the potential value of a click from a given source. This value is based on the type of individual the advertiser is expecting to receive as a visitor to his or her website, and what the advertiser can gain from that visit, usually revenue, both in the short term as well as in the long term. As with other forms of advertising targeting is key, and factors that often play into PPC campaigns include the target''s interest (often defined by a search term they have entered into a search engine, or the content of a page that they are browsing), intent (e.g., to purchase or not), location (for geo targeting), and the day and time that they are browsing. Flat-rate PPC In the flat-rate model, the advertiser and publisher agree upon a fixed amount that will be paid for each click. In many cases the publisher has a rate card that lists the CPC within different areas of their website or network. These various amounts are often related to the content on pages, with content that generally attracts more valuable visitors having a higher CPC than content that attracts less valuable visitors. However, in many cases advertisers can negotiate lower rates, especially when committing to a long-term or high-value contract. The flat-rate model is particularly common to comparison shopping engines, which typically publish rate cards. However, these rates are sometimes minimal, and advertisers can pay more for greater visibility. These sites are usually neatly compartmentalized into product or service categories, allowing a high degree of targeting by advertisers. In many cases, the entire core content of these sites is paid ads Bid-based PPC In the bid-based model, the advertiser signs a contract that allows them to compete against other advertisers in a private auction hosted by a publisher or, more commonly, an advertising network. Each advertiser informs the host of the maximum amount that he or she is willing to pay for a given ad spot (often based on a keyword), usually using online tools to do so. The auction plays out in an automated fashion every time a visitor triggers the ad spot. When the ad spot is part of a search engine results page (SERP), the automated auction takes place whenever a search for the keyword that is being bid upon occurs. All bids for the keyword that target the searcher''s geo-location, the day and time of the search, etc. are then compared and the winner determined. In situations where there are multiple ad spots, a common occurrence on SERPs, there can be multiple winners whose positions on the page are influenced by the amount each has bid. The ad with the highest bid generally shows up first, though additional factors such as ad quality and relevance can sometimes come into play (see Quality Score). In addition to ad spots on SERPs, the major advertising networks allow for contextual ads to be placed on the properties of 3rd-parties with whom they have partnered. These publishers sign up to host ads on behalf of the network. In return, they receive a portion of the ad revenue that the network generates, which can be anywhere from 50% to over 80% of the gross revenue paid by advertisers. These properties are often referred to as a content network and the ads on them as contextual ads because the ad spots are associated with keywords based on the context of the page on which they are found. In general, ads on content networks have a much lower click-through rate (CTR) and conversion rate (CR) than ads found on SERPs and consequently are less highly valued. Content network properties can include websites, newsletters, and e-mails. Advertisers pay for each click they receive, with the actual amount paid based on the amount bid. It is common practice amongst auction hosts to charge a winning bidder just slightly more (e.g. one penny) than the next highest bidder or the actual amount bid, whichever is lower. This avoids situations where bidders are constantly adjusting their bids by very small amounts to see if they can still win the auction while paying just a little bit less per click. To maximize success and achieve scale, automated bid management systems can be deployed. These systems can be used directly by the advertiser, though they are more commonly used by advertising agencies that offer PPC bid management as a service. These tools generally allow for bid management at scale, with thousands or even millions of PPC bids controlled by a highly automated system. The system generally sets each bid based on the goal that has been set for it, such as maximize profit, maximize traffic at breakeven, and so forth. The system is usually tied into the advertiser''s website and fed the results of each click, which then allows it to set bids. The effectiveness of these systems is directly related to the quality and quantity of the performance data that they have to work with - low-traffic ads can lead to a scarcity of data problem that renders many bid management tools useless at worst, or inefficient at best. Social media marketing Social media marketing is a recent addition to organizations’ integrated marketing communications plans. Integrated marketing communications is a principle organizations follow to connect with their targeted markets. Integrated marketing communications coordinates the elements of the promotional mix; advertising, personal selling, public relations, publicity, direct marketing, and sales promotion. In the traditional marketing communications model, the content, frequency, timing, and medium of communications by the organization is in collaboration with an external agent, i.e. advertising agencies, marketing research firms, and public relations firms. However, the growth of social media has impacted the way organizations communicate. With the emergence of Web 2.0, the internet provides a set of tools that allow people to build social and business connections, share information and collaborate on projects online. Social media marketing programs usually center on efforts to create content that attracts attention and encourages readers to share it with their social networks. A corporate message spreads from user to user and presumably resonates because it is coming from a trusted source, as opposed to the brand or company itself. Social media has become a platform that is easily accessible to anyone with internet access, opening doors for organizations to increase their brand awareness and facilitate conversations with the customer. Additionally, social media serves as a relatively inexpensive platform for organizations to implement marketing campaigns. With emergence of services like Twitter, the barrier to entry in social media is greatly reduced. Report from company Sysomos shows that half of the users using Twitter are located outside US demonstrating the global significance of social media marketing. Organizations can receive direct feedback from their customers and targeted markets. Platforms Social media marketing which is known as SMO Social Media Optimization benefits organizations and individuals by providing an additional channel for customer support, a means to gain customer and competitive insight, recruitment and retention of new customers/business partners, and a method of managing their reputation online. Key factors that ensure its success are its relevance to the customer, the value it provides them with and the strength of the foundation on which it is built. A strong foundation serves as a stand or platform in which the organization can centralize its information and direct customers on its recent developments via other social media channels, such as article and press release publications. The most popular platforms include: * Blogs * Delicious * Facebook * Flickr * Hi5 * LinkedIn * MySpace * Reddit * Tagged * Twitter * YouTube * More... Web analytics Web analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of internet data for purposes of understanding and optimizing web usage. Web analytics is not just a tool for measuring website traffic but can be used as a tool for business research and market research. Web analytics applications can also help companies measure the results of traditional print advertising campaigns. It helps one to estimate how the traffic to the website changed after the launch of a new advertising campaign. Web analytics provides data on the number of visitors, page views, etc. to gauge the traffic and popularity trends which helps doing the market research. There are two categories of web analytics; off-site and on-site web analytics. Off-site web analytics refers to web measurement and analysis regardless of whether you own or maintain a website. It includes the measurement of a website''s potential audience (opportunity), share of voice (visibility), and buzz (comments) that is happening on the Internet as a whole. On-site web analytics measure a visitor''s journey once on your website. This includes its drivers and conversions; for example, which landing pages encourage people to make a purchase. On-site web analytics measures the performance of your website in a commercial context. This data is typically compared against key performance indicators for performance, and used to improve a web site or marketing campaign''s audience response. Historically, web analytics has referred to on-site visitor measurement. However in recent years this has blurred, mainly because vendors are producing tools that span both categories. On-site web analytics technologies Many different vendors provide on-site web analytics software and services. There are two main technological approaches to collecting the data. The first method, logfile analysis, reads the logfiles in which the web server records all its transactions. The second method, page tagging, uses JavaScript on each page to notify a third-party server when a page is rendered by a web browser. Both collect data that can be processed to produce web traffic reports. In addition other data sources may also be added to augment the data. For example; e-mail response rates, direct mail campaign data, sales and lead information, user performance data such as click heat mapping, or other custom metrics as needed. Key definitions There are no globally agreed definitions within web analytics as the industry bodies have been trying to agree definitions that are useful and definitive for some time. The main bodies who have had input in this area have been Jicwebs(Industry Committee for Web Standards)/ABCe (Auditing Bureau of Circulations electronic, UK and Europe), The WAA (Web Analytics Association, US) and to a lesser extent the IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau). This does not prevent the following list from being a useful guide, suffering only slightly from ambiguity. Both the WAA and the ABCe provide more definitive lists for those who are declaring their statistics using the metrics defined by either. * Hit - A request for a file from the web server. Available only in log analysis. The number of hits received by a website is frequently cited to assert its popularity, but this number is extremely misleading and dramatically over-estimates popularity. A single web-page typically consists of multiple (often dozens) of discrete files, each of which is counted as a hit as the page is downloaded, so the number of hits is really an arbitrary number more reflective of the complexity of individual pages on the website than the website''s actual popularity. The total number of visitors or page views provides a more realistic and accurate assessment of popularity. * Page view - A request for a file whose type is defined as a page in log analysis. An occurrence of the script being run in page tagging. In log analysis, a single page view may generate multiple hits as all the resources required to view the page (images, .js and .css files) are also requested from the web server. * Visit / Session - A visit is defined as a series of page requests from the same uniquely identified client with a time of no more than 30 minutes between each page request. A session is defined as a series of page requests from the same uniquely identified client with a time of no more than 30 minutes and no requests for pages from other domains intervening between page requests. In other words, a session ends when someone goes to another site, or 30 minutes elapse between page views, whichever comes first. A visit ends only after a 30 minute time delay. If someone leaves a site, then returns within 30 minutes, this will count as one visit but two sessions. In practice, most systems ignore sessions and many analysts use both terms for visits. Because time between pageviews is critical to the definition of visits and sessions, a single page view does not constitute a visit or a session (it is a "bounce"). * First Visit / First Session - A visit from a visitor who has not made any previous visits. * Visitor / Unique Visitor / Unique User - The uniquely identified client generating requests on the web server (log analysis) or viewing pages (page tagging) within a defined time period (i.e. day, week or month). A Unique Visitor counts once within the timescale. A visitor can make multiple visits. Identification is made to the visitor''s computer, not the person, usually via cookie and/or IP+User Agent. Thus the same person visiting from two different computers will count as two Unique Visitors. Increasingly visitors are uniquely identified by Flash LSO''s (Local Shared Object), which are less susceptible to privacy enforcement. * Repeat Visitor - A visitor that has made at least one previous visit. The period between the last and current visit is called visitor regency and is measured in days. * New Visitor - A visitor that has not made any previous visits. This definition creates a certain amount of confusion (see common confusions below), and is sometimes substituted with analysis of first visits. * Impression - An impression is each time an advertisement loads on a user''s screen. Anytime you see a banner, that is an impression. * Singletons - The number of visits where only a single page is viewed. While not a useful metric in and of itself the number of singletons is indicative of various forms of Click fraud as well as being used to calculate bounce rate and in some cases to identify automatons bots). * Bounce Rate - The percentage of visits where the visitor enters and exits at the same page without visiting any other pages on the site in between. * % Exit - The percentage of users who exit from a page. * Visibility time - The time a single page (or a blog, Ad Banner...) is viewed. * Session Duration - Average amount of time that visitors spend on the site each time they visit. This metric can be complicated by the fact that analytics programs can not measure the length of the final page view. * Page View Duration / Time on Page - Average amount of time that visitors spend on each page of the site. As with Session Duration, this metric is complicated by the fact that analytics programs can not measure the length of the final page view unless they record a page close event, such as on Unload(). * Active Time / Engagement Time - Average amount of time that visitors spend actually interacting with content on a web page, based on mouse moves, clicks, hovers and scrolls. Unlike Session Duration and Page View Duration / Time on Page, this metric can accurately measure the length of engagement in the final page view. * Page Depth / Page Views per Session - Page Depth is the average number of page views a visitor consumes before ending their session. It is calculated by dividing total number of page views by total number of sessions and is also called Page Views per Session or PV/Session. * Frequency / Session per Unique - Frequency measures how often visitors come to a website. It is calculated by dividing the total number of sessions (or visits) by the total number of unique visitors. Sometimes it is used to measure the loyalty of your audience. * Click path - the sequence of hyperlinks one or more website visitors follows on a given site. * Click - "refers to a single instance of a user following a hyperlink from one page in a site to another". Some use click analytics to analyze their web sites. * Site Overlay is a technique in which graphical statistics are shown besides each link on the web page. These statistics represent the percentage of clicks on each link. Google Penalty Advice Finding the Causes of a Sudden Drop in Ranking To check for Google penalties with any degree of certainty can be difficult. For example, if your website experiences a sudden reduction in ranking for its main keyword terms it can be caused solely by a Google algorithm change or search results (SERP) update. Google penalty example using Analytics When any algorithm change or Google SERP update is released, there are always winners and losers, and when a sudden drop in rankings is experienced Google penalties are often incorrectly blamed. However, where the traffic reduction from Google non-paid search is very extreme, as pictured left (from Google Analytics data - traffic sources > search engines > Google) then a penalty is much more likely. There are a growing number of Google filters now built into the Google algorithm which aim to detect violations of Google Webmaster Guidelines in order to help maintain the quality of Google''s search results (SERP) for any given query. One such algorithmic filter is thought to have caused the massive drop on Google traffic pictured above. Link Devaluation Effects When considering the cause of a ranking reduction, its worth noting that Google continually applies link devaluation to links from various non-reputable sources that it considers spammers are exploiting to artificially raise the ranking of their sites. Hence continual Google algorithm tweaks are being made in an effort to combat link spam. When link devaluation is applied, as it has with reciprocal links as well as links from many paid link advertisements, low quality web directories and link farms, reductions in Google ranking may occur affecting the recipient site of the links. The severity of ranking reductions is usually synonymous with the website''s reliance on that particular type of linking. There''s no doubt that do-follow blog links and low quality web directory links have also been devalued and that this has lead to reduced website rankings for sites which got a significant number of backlinks or site wide links from do-follow blogs or directories. In addition, backlinks from unrelated theme sites are also experiencing Google devaluation - so if your site heavily relies on these links, then it too may experience a sudden drop in Google rankings. If you suspect a Google penalty, it first makes sense to check whether any Google algorithm changes have been made which could be the cause of the problem. SEO Forum posts reflecting algorithm changes usually appear on the SEO Chat Forum soon after the effects of any update are felt. That said, if your website suffers sudden and dramatic fall in ranking and no Google algorithm changes have been made, then a Google penalty or filter may be the cause, especially if you have been embarking on activities which might have contravened Google Webmaster Guidelines. The most severe Google penalties lead to total website de-indexing and where the SEO misdemeanour is serious a site ban may be imposed by Google, accompanied by a Page Rank reduction to 0 and a greyed out Google Toolbar Page Rank indication. Google filters are less extreme, but can still be extremely damaging to a company''s profits. Whatever the cause, recovering from a Google penalty or filter is a challenge and our SEO checklist will help identify likely causes and reasons for a sudden reduction in Google ranking or an major drop in SERPS position for your main keywords. Initial Test for a Penalty When a penalty is suspected, start by checking with Google the number of URL''s it has indexed. This can be accomplished by using the site:yourdomainname.com command within a Google search window. If no URL''s are indexed and no backlinks show up when the link:yourdomain.com is entered then there is a high probability of a Google penalty, especially if your site used to be indexed and used to show backlinks. Another indicator of a Google penalty is ceasing to rank for your own company name, where previously your ranked well for your own brand name. The exception to this rule is a new website with few backlinks, which may not be Google indexed since it is still waiting to be crawled. Such websites frequently show no backlinks, but this doesn''t imply they have received a Google penalty! Not all Google penalties result in a loss of Page Rank. For example, various Google filters can be triggered by unnatural irregularities in backlinks (detected by the clever Google algorithm) or by excessive reciprocal link exchange, particularly using similar keyword optimized anchor text in your links. The example (left) shows a typical reduction in website traffic caused by a Google SEO penalty. Another good indication that a site is under penalty is to take a unique paragraph of text from a popular page on the affected site and searching for it in Google. If the page doesn''t come back as #1 and the page is still showing as cached using cache:www.mydomain.com/page.htm, then this is a good indication that a penalty or filter has been placed on the domain. To avoid a Google penalty or SERPS filter, take particular care when embarking on any link building program. In particular, avoid reciprocal link exchange becoming the main-stay of your SEO campaign. If you suspect your website has received a Google penalty, you can contact Google by sending an e-mail to help@google.com to ask for help. They will usually check the spam report queue and offer some form of assistance. Interestingly, in a recent move by Google, web sites which are in clear violation of Google''s webmaster guidelines or terms of service may receive an e-mail from Google advising them to clean up their act, warning of a penalty and website de-indexing. When the breach of Google''s terms (e.g. link spam or hidden text) is removed from the offending site, Google will usually automatically clear the penalty and re-index the site as many so-called penalties are actually ''filters'' triggered by irregularities found by Google''s algorithm. Google Penalty Checklist If your website has suffered a Google penalty, some free SEO advice to help identify the cause and solve the problem is provided below. Once you have identified the cause of the problem, we suggest watching the Google reconsideration tips video to help prepare a successful reconsideration request to Google. For further assistance with Google penalties contact us for professional help. Linking to banned sites Run a test on all outbound links from your site to see if you are linking to any sites which have themselves been Google banned. These will be sites which are Google de-listed and show Page Rank 0 with a greyed out Toolbar Page Rank indicator. Linking to bad neighborhoods Check you are not linking to any bad neighborhoods (neighborhoods - US spelling), link farms or doorway pages. Bad neighborhoods include spam sites and doorway pages, whilst link farms are just pages of links to other sites, with no original or useful content. If in doubt, we recommend quality checking all of your outbound links to external sites using the Bad Neighborhood detection tool. Whilst this SEO tool isn''t perfect, it may spot "problem sites". Another good tip is to do a Google search for the HTML homepage title of sites that you link to. If the sites don''t come up in the top 20 of the Google SERPS, then they are almost certainly low trust domains and linking to them should be avoided. Automated query penalty Google penalties can sometimes be caused by using automated query tools which make use of Google''s API, particularly when such queries are made from the same IP address that hosts your website. These tools break Google''s terms of service (as laid out in their Webmaster Guidelines). Google allows certain automated queries into its database using its analytic tools and when accessing through a registered Google API account. Unauthorized types of automated query can cause problems, particularly when used excessively. Over optimization penalties and Google filters These can be triggered by poor SEO techniques such as aggressive link building using the same keywords in link anchor text. When managing link building campaigns, always vary the link text used and incorporate a variety of different keyword terms. Use a back link anchor text analyzer tool to check back links for sufficient keyword spread. Optimizing for high paying (often abused) keywords like "Viagra" can further elevate risk, so mix in some long tail keywords into the equation. For brand new domains, be sensible and add a few one way back links a week and use deep linking to website internal pages, rather than just homepage link building. Above all, always vary your link anchor text to incorporate different keywords, not variations on the same keyword! There is strong evidence that Google has introduced some new automatic over optimization filters into their algorithm. These seem to have the effect of applying a penalty to a page which has been over optimized for the same keyword by link building. See Google filters for more information or contact KSL Consulting for assistance (fees apply). Website cross linking & link schemes If you run more than one website and the Google penalty hits all sites at the same time, check the interlinking (cross linking) between those sites. Extensive interlinking of websites, particularly if they are on the same C Class IP address (same ISP) can be viewed as "link schemes" by Google, breaking their terms of service. The risks are even higher where site A site wide links to site B and site B site wide links back to site A. In addition, link schemes offering paid link placement in the footer section of webpages (even on high Page Rank pages) are detectable search engine spam and are best avoided. Site-wide links should also be avoided at all costs. The reality is that site wide links do little to increase site visibility in the Google SERPS, nor do they improve Page Rank more than a single link, as Google only counts one link from a site to another. KSL Consulting also believe that Yahoo! now applies a similar policy. There is some evidence that the extensive use of site-wide links can lower website Google trust value, which can subsequently reduce ranking. Duplicate Content problems Whilst duplicate content in its own right is not thought to trigger Google penalties, it can be responsible for the non-indexation of website content and for placing all duplicate web pages into Google''s supplemental index, which results in pages not ranking in the Google SERP. This can result in significant traffic loss to a site, similar to that caused by a penalty. Google will not index duplicate content and any site which utilizes large amounts of content (like news feeds/articles) featured elsewhere on the web will likely suffer as a result. Hidden text or links Remove any hidden text in your content and remove any hidden keywords. Such content may be hidden from view using CSS or alternatively, text may have been coded to be the same colour as the page background, rendering it invisible. These risky SEO techniques often lead to a Google penalty or web site ban and should be removed immediately. The same applies to hidden links, which Matt Cutts has openly stated break their webmaster guidelines. Keyword stuffing (spamming) Remove excessive keyword stuffing in your website content (unnatural repetitions of the same phrase in body text). Always use natural, well written web copywriting techniques. Check for Malware Problems It is worthwhile carrying out a check to see if Google has blacklisted your site as unsafe for browsing. To assess whether this is the case visit www.google.com/safebrowsing/diagnostic?site=mydomain.co.uk, replacing ''mydomain.co.uk'' with your domain. Automated page redirects The use of automated browser re-directs in any of your pages. Meta Refresh and JavaScript automated re-directs often result in Google penalties as the pages using them are perceived to be doorway pages. This technique is especially dangerous if the refresh time is less than 5 seconds. To avoid Google penalties, use a 301 re-direct or Mod Rewrite technique instead of these methods. This involves setting up a .htaccess file on your web server. Link buying or selling Check for any paid links (I.E. buying text links from known link suppliers / companies). There is some evidence that buying links can hurt rankings and this was implied by comments from Matt Cutts (a Google engineer) on his Google SEO blog. Matt states that Google will also devalue links from companies selling text links, such that they offer zero value to the recipient in terms for improving website rankings or Page Rank. More recently, Google applied a Page Rank penalty to known link sellers and many low quality directories. Reciprocal link building campaigns Excessive reciprocal linking may trigger a Google penalty or cause a SERPS filter to be applied when the same or very similar link anchor text is used over and over again and large numbers of reciprocal links are added in a relatively short time. The dangers are made worse by adding reciprocal links to low quality sites or websites which have an unrelated theme. This can lead to a back link over optimization penalty (known as a BLOOP to SEO experts!). a Google Back link Over Optimization Penalty causes a sudden drops in SERPS ranking (often severe). To avoid this problem, reciprocal link exchange should only be used as part of a more sustainable SEO strategy which also builds quality one way links to original website content. Adding reciprocal links to unrelated sites is a risky SEO strategy, as is reciprocal link exchange with low quality websites. To help identify quality link exchange partners we use a simple but effective test - regardless of indicated Page Rank, if you can''t find a website''s homepage in the top 20 of the Google search results (SERPS) when you search for the first 4 words of a site''s full HTML title (shown at the top of the Internet Explorer window) then undertaking reciprocal link exchange with that site may offer few advantages. Don''t forget to check that prospective reciprocal link partners have a similar theme as your homepage too. Paid links on Commercial Directories Some leading online web directories offer paid placement for multiple regions where a link to your website appears on many pages of the directory with keyword optimized anchor text and these links are search engine accessible (I.E. they have no "nofollow" tag). If you have optimized the same keyword elsewhere in your SEO campaign, adding hundreds of links from commercial directories with the same or similar anchor text in a short space of time can cause serious problems. In extreme cases we''ve seen these kinds of directory links trigger a Google filter. Thin Affiliates and "Made for Adsense" sites It''s a well known fact that Google dislikes affiliate sites with thin content and the same applies to "made to Adsense" sites. Always make sure affiliate sites have quality original content if you don''t want to get them filtered out of the search results when someone completes a Google spam report. We have had personal experience of affiliate sites acquiring a Google penalty, so don''t spend time and money on SEO on such sites without the right content. Content Feeds and I-Frames Whilst content feeds (including RSS) are widely used on the web, there is some evidence that pulling in large amounts of duplicate content through such feeds may have an adverse effect on ranking and in extreme cases may trigger a Google penalty. In particular, the use of I-frames to pull in affiliate content should be avoided where possible. Consider the use of banners and text links as an alternative. Same Registrant Domains As Google has access to the WHOIS records for domains and is known to use this information, it is possible that a penalty applied to one website may reduce the ranking of other websites with the same registrant, although most filters only affect one domain. Check Google Webmaster Guidelines Read the Google Webmaster Guidelines and check website compliance in all respects. Since early 2007, Google may alert webmasters via the Google Webmaster Console who they feel might have unknowingly broken their guidelines to advise them that their site has been removed from Google for a set period of time due to breaking one or more of Google''s Webmaster Guidelines. However, blatant spam or significant breaches of Google''s rules will often result in a site being banned, with no Webmaster Console notification. Where notification of a violation of Google''s guidelines is received, it usually encourages the webmaster to correct the problem/s and then submit a Google re-inclusion request (now referred to as a ''reconsideration request'' in Webmaster Tools). From my experience, after this is done the website will usually regain its original ranking in around 14 days, assuming that all violations of Google''s terms and conditions have been resolved. Google Webmaster Tools According to Matt Cutts''s Blog, Google is improving webmaster communication with respect to banned sites and penalties. Google is now informing some (but not all) webmasters the cause of a website ban or penalty, via their excellent new Webmaster Console. In addition, a Google re-inclusion request can be made from the same interface. For this reason, if you''ve been hit by a web site ban or penalty, it is worthwhile signing up for Google Webmaster Tools and uploading an XML Sitemap onto your site and then to check site status in the Google Webmaster Console. This is an easy 15 minute job and may help to identify the cause and fix for the problem! Preparing Your Site for Google Reconsideration Google recently prepared a Google reconsideration video tutorial on how to create a good reconsideration request, including tips on what Google look for when assessing the reinclusion of any website. The video tutorial is presented by actual members of Google''s reconsideration team and is very helpful to any webmaster looking to successfully prepare a reconsideration request. Google SERP Filters There is clear evidence that over-optimizing a single keyword through adding too many back links and site-wide links can result in triggering a Google filter whereby the recipient page of these links no longer ranks in the organic SERP for the keyword being optimized. Affected page/s appear to still be Google indexed and cached. The Google Trust Rank of the website may be slightly affected leading to a ranking reduction for other keywords. Interestingly though, affected websites can retain ranking for other long tail keywords which have not been over optimized, particularly on pages which have not been subject to aggressive link building, but may have one or two decent natural links. One other fact worth noting is that affected pages seem to have high keyword density to the point of being over-optimized. In some cases changes to increase page keyword density for the problem keyword may have been made shortly prior to the Google filter being applied. In the cases observed, the websites still rank for their company name and pages still show in the Google index (using the site:domain.com command). However, picking a sentence of text from the affected page and searching for it in Google yielded no results. It is therefore fair to assume that the filtered page was all but removed from the index as far as its ability to rank - even for long-tail keywords, although it still showed as being Google cached (cache:domain.com/page). To assess whether your website is affected by a Google SERP filter, do a site-wide back link anchor text analysis using Majestic SEO (free) or a paid SEO tool like SEO Moz Links cape and check the spread of keywords used in links to your page look natural. Check your keyword density too excluding Meta tags. Google is tightening up on link spam in a big way; be warned! Check for a Total Google Website Ban If you''ve used unethical black hat SEO techniques your website could be Google banned and consequently totally de-indexed. If your site no longer shows any pages indexed when the site: www.yourdomain.com command is used in Google (and it was previously indexed), then your site may have received the most extreme form of penalty - a total Google ban. Check for possible causes using the free SEO advice contained in our penalty checklist above. Google Penalty Recovery Strategy Recovering from a Google penalty normally involves fixing the cause of the problem and then waiting for Google to remove any over optimization penalties or SERPS filters. To fully recover Google ranking may take around 2-3 months after all website problems are corrected, although we have seen penalty recovery in a matter of weeks following full and thorough resolution of the Google Webmaster Guidelines infringements. The Google algorithm can automatically remove penalties if the affected website is still Google indexed. To check whether a particular website is still Google indexed, refer to our Google indexing page. If your website has been Google de-indexed and lost Page Rank, then you will need to make a Google re-inclusion request. Where the reason for the penalty is clear, it helps to provide details of any changes you''ve made to correct violations of the Google Webmaster Guidelines. The best recovery strategy from any Google penalty is to thoroughly familiarize yourself with Google Webmaster Guidelines and also check the SEO Chat Forum for threads surrounding any recent Google algorithm changes and to evaluate recent changes made to your website prior to the sudden drop in Google ranking. Don''t forget to check your link building strategy as poor SEO often causes Google penalties. Start by removing any reciprocal links to low quality websites, or sites having no relevance to your website theme. Preparing for a Google Re-Inclusion (Reconsideration) Request We recommend you start by watching the Google reconsideration tips video. If your site has been de-indexed due to a Google penalty, correct the problem and then apply to be re-included in the Google index by submitting a Google re-inclusion request from your Webmaster Tools account. More information about this is provided in Google Webmaster Help. Google refer to this process as making a "reconsideration request" which is now submitted from your Webmaster Tools login. How long does site reconsideration take? By submitting a reconsideration request to Google you enter the queue for the manual review process whereby your site is manually checked for violations of Google''s Webmaster Guidelines. This can take several weeks. At the end of the process, an Inbox message is usually sent to the Webmaster to confirm that the reconsideration has been processed. This will be visible by logging into Webmaster Tools and then checking your Inbox under ''Messages''. Gorilla Marketing (Viral Marketing) Viral marketing and viral advertising are buzzwords referring to marketing techniques that use pre-existing social networks to produce increases in brand awareness or to achieve other marketing objectives (such as product sales) through self-replicating viral processes, analogous to the spread of virus or computer viruses. It can be word-of-mouth delivered or enhanced by the network effects of the Internet. Viral promotions may take the form of video clips, interactive Flash games, advergames, ebooks, brandable software, images, or even text messages. The goal of marketers interested in creating successful viral marketing programs is to identify individuals with high Social Networking Potential (SNP) and create viral messages that appeal to this segment of the population and have a high probability of being taken by another competitor. The term "viral marketing" has also been used pejoratively to refer to stealth marketing campaigns—the unscrupulous use of astronautics on-line combined with under market advertising in shopping centres to create the impression of spontaneous word of mouth enthusiasm. Viral marketing is a imitation which is by using social media and other channels of communication spreading the planned content aiming to reach the most efficient and friendly manner to the target audience. Briefly, the idea spread from person to person. Email Marketing E-mail marketing is a form of direct marketing which uses electronic mail as a means of communicating commercial or fund-raising messages to an audience. In its broadest sense, every e-mail sent to a potential or current customer could be considered e-mail marketing. However, the term is usually used to refer to: * sending e-mails with the purpose of enhancing the relationship of a merchant with its current or previous customers, to encourage customer loyalty and repeat business, * sending e-mails with the purpose of acquiring new customers or convincing current customers to purchase something immediately, * adding advertisements to e-mails sent by other companies to their customers, and * Sending e-mails over the Internet, as e-mail did and does exist outside the Internet (e.g., network e-mail and FIDO).
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Surgical Education – The most reliable and up to date resource for residents and surgeons Starting 1/26/2018, the content is available as iOS or Android app only. The desktop platform will no longer be updated. Please visit App Store  or Google Play to download app. Thank you.    
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HipPocket | Transforming real estate agent communication HipPocket is a communications platform with a suite of products for Real Estate Agents, Brokerages and Realtor Association communities.
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Home | Rethink! IT Europe The must-attend event for IT professionals – Rethink! IT Europe is a strategy event & project exchange, bringing together more than 150+ CIOs and IT decision makers to network, discuss key industry challenges, create new partnerships and to explore the most critical business, technology and leadership strategies relevant to today's CIOs.
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Bopup IM - Secure instant messaging & chat software for private business communications Secure instant messaging (IM) and private LAN chat software for organizing effective real-time communication system over office LANs, business and corporate large networks, enterprise-size WANs and VPNs and Internet. Software products for Windows and mobile platforms include a stand-alone self-hosted IM / chat server called Bopup Communication Server, rich-featured messaging client Bopup Messenger and one-way IM pager called Bopup Observer with a set of business features including internal and safe communications, private collaboration, urgent and priority messaging, alerting and emergency notifications, centralized management, file transfer and message history logging, offline messaging and data delivery, file and document distribution, Terminal Server and Citrix environment support, Active Directory (LDAP) and Microsoft Windows Domain networks integration. HIPAA compliant software for healthcare and clinics, Openfire (XMPP) replacement and competitor.
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AnswerCart - Best Online Community and Forum Management Software! AnswerCart''s forum software help companies build modern, engaging & customer centric community for customer engagement, support & internal collaboration.!
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Communications, Digital, PR, Marketing, Brands – Jigsaw PR & Marketing Edinburgh Welcome to Jigsaw PR & Marketing. We are a leading independent dynamic communications agency servicing brands, family businesses and SMEs. We can help you with Brand building, Community Engagement, Consumer PR, Corporate PR, Copywriting, Digital marketing & Reputation Management, Crisis amongst many other things.
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Social Intranet for G Suite - Happeo The digital workplace and social intranet software, built for Google G Suite. Happeo is a Google technology partner, and have built the social intranet exclusively for G Suite users. Boost your internal communications, and empower collaboration, productivity and bright ideas within your workplace.
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ADI • Landscape Architecture • Urban Design • Master Planning Success through satisfied customers - ADI Group has the leading edge!
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Billings Clinic Internal Medicine Residency Program Billings Clinic Internal Medicine Residency Program received accreditation May 22, 2013. With a severe shortage of primary care physicians in Montana, the residency will help address this crisis. The program will privide training in outpatient and hospital settings and teach our methods for providing care to our rural communities through collaboration, technology and outreach clinics.
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Formula Hybrid | The Future on Track The Formula Hybrid Competition is an interdisciplinary design and engineering challenge for undergraduate and graduate university students. Founded and run by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth since 2006, Formula Hybrid takes place each spring at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, NH.
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American University of Sovereign Nations (AUSN) - Welcome to the American University of Sovereign Nations (AUSN). AUSN is a member of the United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI). The AUSN represents a monumental historic development: this project represents the development of the First-ever US Medical School and First-ever Master of Public Health (MPH) program to be located on Native American Sovereign Land. We are a brand new graduate school, and since receiving our license to teach on 21 April 2014, we have exponentially grown - we have 45 Alumni, and 100 students enrolled from 40 countries of the world.Please download a 4-page pdf file for donors on Reasons to Give Please download the AUSN Brochure to see photographs of most faculty members, and other information (pdf file, May 2017 edition). AUSN is registered as an official “Public Charity” by the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS), under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, which means that AUSN is able to receive tax deductible bequests, devises, transfers or gifts. AUSN welcomes all donations of any size, named or anonymous, as the donor chooses. AUSN is providing scholarships and other funding to empower people who are making the world better, so we really need donations, large or small, to help us provide quality education at a price each person can afford.AUSN has an expressed and dedicated commitment toward academic excellence, the pursuit of truth and social justice, the discovery of new knowledge through the attainment of the highest level of academia, scholarship, research, critical-thinking and analysis. AUSN is strongly based in the promotion of respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms, peace, the sense of human dignity, and the promotion of understanding, tolerance and friendship amongst all nations and all peoples.AUSN is deeply committed to offering excellence of education, academia and scholarship, through which we will,provide our students the intellectual freedoms and ability to rejoice in the discovery of critical thought and the pursuit of excellence;provide our students the knowledge and the commitment required for full participation and service as future members and leaders of the learned professions;properly prepare future leaders of our communities who will be committed and vigorously engaged in helping those who suffer, are burdened by social injustices, or who are striken by disease, and do so for the benefit of all peoples and populations;help our students understand the sense of obligation of citizenship, and need for a requisite commitment to the promotion of human tolerance and understanding, human respect, integrity, and human dignity.If you are moved by the pursuit of social justice and in the advancement of the public’s health, sustainability, safety and welfare, and you seek excellence in all that you do, desire to make a difference in the lives of others, and have the wisdom to move forward with your dreams, we welcome you to AUSN.We believe that you will find AUSN to be a friend of your future while you pursue your journey of education toward becoming a scholar, a contributor to society, a worthy citizen of the world, and an advocate for what is right.AUSN has over 30 International Collaboration Agreements, where we often conduct AUSN Intensive Courses, Training Workshops and students go for exchange visits and research.
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Intraboom - The Leading Cloud-Based Digital Workplace Intraboom - the new mobile intranet and digital workplace - an all-in-one communication solution for your business. A fun and engaging intra-team collaboration tool for all your communication needs.
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Wizergos Collaboration Platform Wizergos Collaboration Platform for teams to collaborate with internal team members and external customers. Built for easy automation with Artificial Intelligence, Natural Language Processing and Understanding.
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ICPE ICPE is an international and intergovernmental organization with the aim of promotion and development of entrepreneurship, efficient and socially responsible management of public enterprises and development of public-private partnership
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Internal — Official site Internal – it''s a free collaboration of two designers. We are interested in brand style, illustration and web design. We are always open for challenging projects.
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Signal Kit - Smart tools. Effective Communication. Signal Kit is the complete communication suite for your K-12 community: cloud-based mass communication, internal collaboration and oversight.
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Office Curry - Blending business communication and team collaboration Office curry helps internal employee communication by using a mobile business app for the entire workforce including management tools and instant messaging
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Collective Innovation – Ideation Management Software Enterprise software to increase internal innovation through collaboration. Use internally or in an open innovation process. Get better ideas, make faster decisions.
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Intranet.org About intranet.org, intranets in general and additional resources.
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Easy Company Intranet & Wiki Software | Papyrs Build a modern simple intranet or internal wiki site for your company in seconds with our easy web-based software. Get organized with a central knowledge base and internal website.
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Project Management Software, Tools, and Applications for Online Collaboration | TeamWork Live TeamWork Live is the leading web-based online project management software and collaboration tool for managing internal and client projects.
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Siminars: Easiest way to create online courses The best platform to create online courses. Build, publish & distribute highly effective courses fast. Free for life trial version, no monthly commitments
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Cobrainer - Empower your Employees with ‍Expertise Intelligence. Revolutionise work and collaboration with expertise intelligence. The digital platform for driving internal mobility and employees' life long development.
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RubyApps RubyApps powers cross-functional collaboration by providing a platform for internal and external teams to cooperatively and securely manage, share, publish, repurpose and distribute mission-critical business content.
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Prototype | Prototyping Your Future / HCI IxD Any large organisation, be it public or private, monitors the media for information to keep abreast of developments in their field of interest, and usually also to become aware of positive or negative opinions expressed towards them. At least for the written media, computer programs have become very efficient at helping the human analysts significantly in their monitoring task by gathering media reports, analysing them, detecting trends and – in some cases – even to issue early warnings. We present here trend recognition-related functionality of the Europe Media Monitor (EMM) system, which was developed by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) for public administrations in the European Union (EU) and beyond. EMM performs large-scale media analysis in up to seventy languages and recognises various types of trends, some of them combining information from news articles written in different languages. EMM also lets users explore the huge amount of multilingual media data through interactive maps and graphs, allowing them to examine the data from various view points and according to multiple criteria. A lot of EMM's functionality is accessibly freely over the internet or via apps for hand-held devices. Introduction Automated Content Analysis (ACA) is likely to be more limited than human intelligence for tasks such as evaluating the relevance of information for a certain purpose, or such as drawing high-level conclusions. Computer programs are also error-prone because human language is inherently ambiguous and text often only makes sense when the meaning of words and sentences is combined with the fundamental world knowledge only people have. However, computers have the advantage that they can easily process more data in a day than a person can read in a life time. Computer programs are particular useful in application areas with a time component, such as monitoring the live printed online media, because they can ingest the latest news articles as soon as they get published and they can detect changes and recognise and visualise trends. Due to the amount of textual information they can process, computer programs can be used to gain a wider view based on more empirical evidence. These features make ACA applications powerful tools to complement human intelligence. At least for the written media, the manual paper clipping process of the past – cutting out newspaper articles and combining them into a customised in-house news digest – has to a large extent been replaced by automatic systems. Computers can take over repetitive work such as gathering media reports automatically, categorising them according to multiple categories, grouping related documents, recognising references to persons, organisations and locations in them, etc. Using this filtered and pre-processed data, human analysts can then focus on the more demanding tasks of evaluating the data, selecting the most relevant information and drawing conclusions. The work of analysts will be more efficient if the computer programs can extract more information and the more high-level information they can recognise. Trend recognition is deemed particularly useful as it partially summarises events and it may help users detect hidden developments that can only be seen from a bird's perspective, i.e. by viewing very large amounts of data. Trend visualisations may serve as early warning tools, e.g. when certain keywords are suddenly found frequently or when any combination of other text features suddenly changes, compared to the usual average background. Trend prediction would then be the next logical step: based on regular historical observations specifically co-occurring with certain trends, it should be possible to predict certain trends when the same feature combinations occur again. Such an effort was described by O'Brien (2002) for the challenging domain of conflict and instability. A major challenge for complex subject domains such as societal conflict or war is that the data needed for making a reliable prediction may simply not exist and/or that some specific factors may decide on whether or not a conflict arises, factors that lie outside the realm of statistical analysis (e.g. the sudden sickness or death of a political leader). In any case, features for predictions should probably include data that can only be found outside the document corpus, such as statistical indicators on the economy and on the society (More REFS). The main disciplines contributing to ACA are called computational linguistics, natural language processing, language engineering or text mining. In recent years, this field has made a leap forward due to insights and methods developed in statistics and in machine learning, and of course due to the strong increase of computer power, the availability of large collections of machine-readable documents and the existence of the internet. In Section 2, we will give an overview of EMM, its functionality and its users. We will particularly point out the usefulness of aggregating information derived from the news in many different languages, which has the advantage of reducing any national bias and of benefitting from information complementarity observed in media sources written in different languages. In Section 3, we will then present a variety of trend presentations and data visualisation techniques used in EMM. These include time series graphs using numbers of articles on a certain subject, the usage of automatically extracted information on named entities mentioned in any selection of news, map representations combining geographical and subject domain information, opinion trends, graphs comparing information derived from the social media with that from the online version of printed media, and more. In Section 4, we summarise the benefits of automatic media monitoring, not without pointing out limitations of ACA and the potential dangers of relying on automatically derived information based on large volumes of textual data. Europe Media Monitor (EMM) A brief Overview 2.1 Overview Europe Media Monitor (EMM) stands for a whole family of media gathering and analysis applications, including NewsBrief, NewsExplorer, the Medical Information System MedISys, BlogBrief, NewsDesk and more (Steinberger et al. 2009). EMM was entirely developed at the JRC. While the main users are the EU institutions and the national authorities of the 28 EU member states, EMM was also made accessible to international organisations (e.g. various United Nations sub-organisations, the African Union and the Organisation of American States) and to the national authorities of selected partner countries of the EU. The first version of NewsBrief came online in 2002 while NewsExplorer came in 2004, but both systems processed smaller volumes of news and they had less functionality. EMM currently gathers a daily average of about 220,000 online news articles per day in seventy languages from approximately 4,000 different web sources (status May 2015). The news sources were manually selected with the purpose to represent the major newspapers of all countries in the world and to include European-language news (especially English) from around the world. For reasons of balance, it was decided not to include all easily accessible news sources, but to monitor a comparable number of news sources per country, with a focus on Europe. EMM additionally processes news feeds from over twenty press agencies. It visits news-like websites such as governmental and non-governmental web pages and it monitors social media such as Twitter, FaceBook and selected blog sites. The public versions of EMM do not show commercially acquired documents and usually have less functionality than the EC-internal versions. Separately for each language, the news articles then undergo a series of processing steps, including language recognition, document duplicate detection, Named Entity Recognition (NER) for persons, organisations and locations, quotation extraction, sentiment/tonality analysis, categorisation into one or more of the over 1,000 different subject domain classes. EMM then clusters related articles into groups, which allows users to examine the load of articles in an organised fashion. The different EMM applications provide different functionality, described in the next section. Family of EMM news monitoring applications NewsBrief (Figure 1) is the most widely used system. It provides users with near-real-time information on their field of interest in all seventy languages. Separately for each language, news gathered within a sliding four-hour window (8 hours for some languages) are clustered, but older articles remain linked to the cluster as long as new articles arrive. For each cluster, automatically extracted meta-information such as named entities and quotations are displayed. Continuously updated graphs show the ten currently largest clusters and their development over time. By clicking on any of the clusters, users can see the list of all articles and click on each article to read the entire text on the website where it was originally found. For fourteen languages, an automatically pre-generated translation into English is available. For event types with relevance to health, safety and security, NewsBrief also displays automatically extracted event information (eight languages only), including the event type, location and time of the event, number and type of victims (dead, injured, infected), and – where this was mentioned – the perpetrator (the person or group inflicting the damage). The limitation of the event types is due to the user groups, which are mostly concerned with providing support in case of disasters, epidemics, etc. NewsBrief offers subscriptions for automatic updates per category by email, for institutional users also via SMS. BlogBrief provides the same functionality as NewsBrief, but instead of news, it processes English language blogs by bloggers who have been hand-selected due to their importance or impact (e.g. politicians and journalists). MedISys is rather similar to NewsBrief, except that all its content categories are related to issues that are relevant for Public Health monitoring. Its news categories include all major communicable diseases and other Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) dangers, symptoms, as well as subjects of scientific or societal value such as vaccinations and genetically modified organisms. NewsExplorer provides a more long-term view of the news (in 21 languages only) and it provides a cross-lingual functionality. Rather than displaying and grouping the current news, NewsExplorer clusters the news of a whole calendar day and displays the clusters ordered by size. For each cluster, hyperlinks lead users to the equivalent news clusters in any of the other twenty languages (where applicable) and to historically related news. NewsExplorer also includes hundreds of thousands of entity pages (persons, organisations and more), where historically gathered information on each entity is aggregated and displayed, including name variants, titles, clusters and quotes where the entity was mentioned, quotes issued by that person, other entities frequently mentioned together with this entity, and more (see Figure 2). NewsDesk is a tool for human moderation. It allows media monitoring professionals to view and select the automatically pre-processed news data and to easily create readily formatted in-house newsletters. EMM Apps for mobile devices such as iOS and Android phones and tablets first became publicly and freely available in 2013 (See Figure 3). Due to the personal nature of such devices, it became first possible to display customised starting pages for each user. For the iOS EMM App alone, about 26,000 downloads were recorded up to May 2015. This customisable version of EMM became very popular so that this functionality was implemented in a new web version of EMM, called MyNews (see below). The EMM App uses a whole new concept and way to interact with EMM Metadata, referred to as Channels. A channel is a stream of EMM articles that all share the same metadata: Channels can be (a) any News Category, (b) the Top 20 Stories in a particular language, (c) a Country/Category combination, (d) an entity recognised by EMM or (e) a search in the full-text index. Users can create such channels for themselves and they can group channels into sets, allowing them to browse freely between channels in any of these sets. When users open a channel, they get access to all the articles that are present in the channel at the time, plus the other metadata that EMM has identified and associated to that channel. Users can of course also browse the attached meta-data, turn them into new channels and pin them to the current set. Crisis management tools and products have been found to be challenging to design and produce due to the complexity of dynamic customisable data-sets defined by each individual user. The main problems in designing such tools are ambiguity, multi-platform support, data representation and other pitfalls commonly seen in mobile technology development. We adhere to a model-based methodology focusing on core functionality and logical interactions with the data-set, user-centric design and data visualisation while supporting other development activities including a requirement analysis for a wide set of devices and operating systems, verification and validation. The result of the development cycle is a layout structure in which a wide scale of EMM crisis management tools has been developed. There are many digital solutions aiming to support humanitarian and emergency response tools by means of open source information gathering and text analysis. A strong trend among those tools is the ability to detect and analyse vast amounts of data, highlighting important developments relevant to each user and use. Many solutions are already operational today, the majority of these solutions requires the user to open a webpage a few times every day to get updated. Other solutions are relying on communicating with external servers, which is expensive and demanding in maintenance. They additionally usually require user authentication, which can compromise privacy and security. Our own solution allows custom notifications based on changes in the specific data set the user has defined. When a logical threshold is activated the system displays a notification directly on the user's mobile device. By merging our notifications with the core system notification system of the mobile device, we alert the user only when it is appropriate. For example, notification will wait silently when the user is asleep and will schedule the notifications to be presented a few minutes after the user has started using the device. This is being done without any user intervention or pre-settings. This novel solution differentiates itself from most notification solutions in the fact that it does not rely on any server side technology. The application itself calculates when and how notifications are presented to the user based on an internal logic crossed with background fetching of the current total data set. MyNews is the first customisable web interface to the news items supplied by the EMM engine designed for desktop browsers. It only became available in 2015. It requires logging in and is only available in-house, i.e. it is not accessible to the wider public. MyNews is highly customisable, since it allows users to define their own specific view by selecting the topics they are most interested in. This is achieved – similarly to the EMM mobile apps – by allowing users to tune news channels focused on very specific topics. They can create as many channels as they like, and they can organise them into sets (see Figure 4). There are many different ways to create new channels, which increases greatly the flexibility of the tool, combining as a union or as an intersection of article selections based on (a) text language, (b) news categories, (c) entities, (d) news from a certain country or (e) news about a certain country, (f) top stories (i.e. the biggest clusters of news talking about the same event) or (g) freely chosen search words. When visualising the contents of any of the channels, the meta-data relating specifically to this selection of news is displayed visually (see Figure 5). The Big Screen App, available since 2014, offers a view of EMM that is visible on large screens in central locations at user organisations. It shows a revolving and continuously updated view of what is happening around the world, targeted to the respective user communities, using text, maps and graphs. Citizens and Science (CAS) is a project that aims to gauge the relative importance of reporting on Science & Technology (S&T) in traditional and social media. It does this by comparing the reporting volume from a number of European Nations and the USA of items that correspond to a number of predefined S&T categories. The sources of these items are taken from the traditional online news media, public posts from FaceBook and tweets from Twitter. CAS allows investigating the relative dominance of certain themes across different media (traditional vs. social), languages and countries and it can help find empirical evidence of biased reporting (see Figure 6; more detail in Section 3.2). Details on ingested news, sources, numbers, geographical distribution Event extraction Multilinguality in EMM Multilinguality is an extremely important feature in this news monitoring application. Covering so many languages is not only important because the European Union consists of 28 Member States with 24 official EU languages. The coverage of news in 70 different languages is also due to the insight that news reporting is complementary across different countries and languages, both regarding the contents and the opinions expressed in the media. By gathering and analysing different languages, EMM reduces any national or regional bias and it increases the coverage of events and of opinions. While major world events such as large-scale disasters, major sports events, wars and meetings of world leaders are usually also reported in English, there is ample evidence that only a minority of the smaller events is reported on in the press outside the country where the event happens. Many EMM users have specialised interests such as the monitoring of events that may have negative effects on Public Health (e.g. disease outbreaks, reports on food poisoning, lack of access to medicines) or on the stability or welfare of a country (e.g. clashes between ethnic groups, accidents, crime). An analysis has shown that the vast majority of such events is not translated or reported abroad (Piskorski et al. 2011 – PROVIDE DETAILED NUMBERS). The links between related clusters across different languages in NewsExplorer show that only some of the news items in each country or language have an equivalent in other languages while the majority of news clusters talk about subjects of national interest. Figure 7, taken from the live EMM news cluster world map, also gives evidence of the uneven distribution of language reporting for locations on the globe: News mentioning locations in Latin America are mostly reported in Spanish and Portuguese; there is little news on Russia and China that is not written in Russian or Chinese, respectively, etc. Only by combining the world news in all different languages do we get a fuller picture of what is happening . Trend observation and distribution statistics in EMM In this section, we want to give some concrete examples of trend monitoring, as well as of bird's views of large amounts of media data giving insights in the relative distribution of news contents. The selection of examples shown here is based on wanting to present different visualisation principles or types, but it is naturally also driven by the interests of EMM users. Since EMM monitors in near-real time (time stamp) large amounts of media reports from around the world and it keeps track of the information (e.g. news provenance, news source, publication language, URL, media type, time of publication, etc.) and it additionally extracts categories and features (e.g. subject domain; number of related articles; names of persons, organisations and locations; sentiment; combinations of features; average values, etc.), it is in principle possible to produce and visualise statistics on any feature or feature combination. This can be done for a specific point in time (most EMM users are interested in now), it can be done for any moment back in time, it is possible to compare current values to average values, and it is possible to perform a time series analysis, i.e. it is possible to show any change over time. Note, however, that, while all such meta-data extracted by EMM can be stored, the original full text of the news has to be deleted after the analysis, for copyright reasons. Users will thus be able to see the meta data and a snippet of the news text (title and the first few words), but if they want to see the full text, they have to follow the hyperlink provided. Whether or not the full text is still accessible then depends on the news source. In the following sub-sections, we will present some types of trend observations and visual presentations of distribution statistics. Bar graphs and pie charts The simplest and probably clearest way of presenting static data is achieved using bar graphs and pie charts. Figure 5 shows three different bar charts to visualise different aspects for the same selection of news documents (provenance of the news, countries mentioned in the articles, and subject domains/entities referred to). These charts give the reader an overview of the whole collection of documents and it thus helps them evaluate and categorise the contents before reading them in detail. Figure 7b shows the language distribution of a multilingual set of European news articles talking on the subject of Science & Technology and comparing it with the language distribution in all articles covering the same time period. It is immediately visible that English and Polish language articles (left) are over-proportionally talking about S&T, while German and French S&T articles are under-represented, compared to the average. Maps visualising geographical distributions Map views are rather popular and intuitive. Figure 5 shows an aggregated map view (number of articles per continent/country/region, depending on the zoom level) while Figure 7 shows all news clusters (or those in a selection of languages). Many types of map data are available, allowing to combine any EMM information with third-party information, as seen in Figure 8 . Any map data in EMM is hyperlinked to the underlying news articles together with the extracted meta-information so that users can verify the contents and read the underlying news sources. Trend graphs Trend graphs show a simple correlation between at least two variables, of which one is time. Typically, they take the shape of line graphs or bar graphs where one axis represents time. Figure 1 shows the size (number of news articles) of the ten largest English language news clusters and their development over the past 12 hours, with a ten-minute resolution (update frequency). The interactive graph clearly shows which stories are most discussed. By hovering with the mouse over any of the points, the most typical news article header of that moment in time is shown so that users can get informed of the development of that story. The system decides on the most typical article header statistically by selecting the medoid, i.e. the document that is closest to the centroid of the vector. By clicking on any of the curves, a new page will open showing the articles that are part of that cluster plus all meta-information available to the system. This graph thus shows ten trend lines in one graph, for the sake of comparison. Similarly, Figure 6 visualises the numbers of news articles and of Social Media postings over time on four science areas. The graph shows longer-term developments. The chosen resolution is one day. For each of the four science areas, two trend curves are displayed to facilitate the visual understanding of the relative long-term development. Such graphs can be rather revealing. For instance, Figure 9 compares Science & Technology reporting in Europe and in the US. For better comparison, the numbers have been normalised: the x-axis shows the percentage of S&T articles compared to all articles, instead of absolute numbers. This graph reveals that the intensity of reporting on S&T in Europe lags behind that observed in US-American media (0.5% of all articles in all languages in the EU vs. 2.8% in the USA report about S&T). Comparing only English language articles in predominantly English-speaking countries (UK and Ireland in Europe; graph not shown here) with the English language articles in the USA, the difference is smaller, but it still notable (1.5% of articles in the UK and in Ireland vs. 3.2% in the USA). To put these numbers into perspective: the reporting on the reference categories Conflict, Ecology, Society and Sports, considering only the English language, was respectively 2.56%, 0.14%, 0.59% and 5.46% for the USA and 1.93%, 0.09%, 0.45% and 6.63% for the EU. This means that the reporting on S&T issues does not fall far behind the reporting on Sports in the USA, but in Europe reporting on Sports is 4 times more than on S&T issues. Note that, in EMM, sports articles are additionally only taken from general news streams because EMM does not scan sports pages of news sites. Looking in detail at a specific topic such as Space, we observe that there is a very strong correlation between the peaks, but the volumes are much smaller in the UK and Ireland, compared to the USA (See Figure 9). Other than a weak correlation between product announcements in the media and on twitter, we have not observed a clear media-driven discussion on the social media, i.e. we have not been able to establish any correlation between media reports and the user-driven content. Such data is a good starting point for the work of social scientists, who can then search for an interpretation and for explanations. Economists and politicians may then think of possible remedies (if needed and wanted). Figure 10 shows the interactive long-term news story timeline produced in EMM-NewsExplorer. The graph shows the number of news articles per day in the daily news clusters about the same event or subject. By hovering over any of the bars, the news cluster title is displayed so that users can explore what happened that day. By clicking on that day, the users are taken to the page with information on that day's news cluster in order to read the articles, see the related meta-information and follow hyperlinks to related reports in other languages. The graph allows exploring developments over longer periods of time and refreshing one's memory on what happened when. Figure 11 shows the development of positive or negative tonality (or sentiment) measured in English and French news articles, using a one-week resolution. Early warning graphs Figure 8 visualises results on the most recent events of a certain type, allowing stakeholders to become aware of the latest developments, to deepen their understanding of what happened (by reading the related news articles) and to take action, if needed. Another type of early warning is achieved with statistical means, as shown at the top of Figure 10, taken from EMM's Medical Information System MedISys. The graph called daily alert statistics shows the currently biggest threats world-wide, with decreasing relevance from left to right (the red threats are the ones with the highest alert levels). MedISys counts the number of articles in the last 24 hours for any country-threat combination (e.g. tuberculosis and Poland) and compares it to the two-week average count for this same combination. This ratio is then normalised by the number of articles for different days of the week (there are less articles on the weekend). The alert statistics graph then shows the results of all calculations, ranked by the value of this ratio . Note that the ratio is entirely independent of the absolute numbers as it rather measures the unexpectedness. Each country-threat combination is shown in two columns: the left one (light blue) shows the observed number of articles while the right one (red, yellow or blue) shows the expected two-week average. An important feature of this graph and of MedISys/EMM as a whole is that this alert is language-independent. The same categories for countries and for threats exist for (almost) all EMM languages, meaning that the articles may be found in one language only (e.g. Polish or Arabic), which often is different from the languages spoken by the MedISys user. The graph is interactive: Users can click on any of the bars to jump to a new page where all relevant articles for this country-threat combination are displayed, together with a heat map and a trend line showing the development over the past 14 days. The Spain-legionellosis threat combination in Figure 10 no longer is a top threat as it had already been reported on for four days. Further graph types used in EMM Figure 11 shows a node graph visualising co-occurrence relations between people. For each person, the 100 most associated entities (persons or organisations) are displayed. The subset of common entities is highlighted in red. The graph is interactive: by clicking on any of the entity nodes, they jump to a page with the news mentioning that entity and displaying all automatically extracted meta-information (e.g. Figure 2), or to the Wikipedia page for that entity. Further entities can be added to the same graph. EMM-NewsExplorer produces the correlation data by counting which entities are mentioned together with which other entities in the same news items. In order to suppress media VIPs such as the US president from the purely frequency-based correlation lists (called 'related entities' in NewsExplorer), a weighting formula is used that brings those entities to the top that are mostly mentioned together with this person and not so much with other persons. The data, referred to in NewsExplorer as 'associated entities', is produced on the basis of mention co-occurrence in the news in 21 different languages, i.e. it is less biased by the reporting language than data produced by a monolingual media monitoring system. EMM recognises direct speech quotations in the news in about twenty different languages and keeps track of who issued the quotation and who is mentioned inside the quotation. Figure 12 shows a quotation network indicating who mentions whom (arrows). Persons most referred to are automatically placed closer to the centre of the graph. During the 2007 presidential elections in France, it was observed that Nicolas Sarkozy, who was the winner of the elections, was consistently more central than his opponent Ségolène Royal. Quotation networks are no longer used in EMM. The same applies to topic maps, which display the most prominent subject matters referred to in a document collection. The topics are grouped into islands of relatedness (using a method known as Kohonen Maps). The more prominent a group of topics is in the collection, the higher the mountains on the island, with peaks being snow-covered. Summary and conclusions, pitfalls Computers have the ability to sieve through large volumes of data in little time and the technologies required for Automated Content Analysis (ACA) have matured to a level where automatically produced results can be useful for the human analyst. We have argued that a man-machine collaboration for the analysis of large volumes of media reports will produce best results because people and computers have complementary strengths. We have presented the main functionality of the European Commission's family of Europe Media Monitor (EMM) applications, which currently gathers an average of 220,000 online news articles per day from about 5,000 online news sources in seventy languages (and also from social media postings about certain themes), categorises the news into about 2,000 different categories, groups related articles, extracts various types of information from them, links related articles over time and across languages and presents the analysis results in a variety of ways to the human end user. Moderation tools support the users in viewing the data, in selecting and amending it and in producing in-house newsletters for the information-seeking decision takers. Monitoring not only English or some widely spoken languages is important in order to avoid bias and also because the news is complementary across languages, both for contents and for the sentiment contained therein. Automatic tools that process and analyse documents turn unstructured information into a structured format that can easily be processed by machines and that also provides useful data for the human user. This results in a data collection, where for each article, we know the news source, the country of origin, the language, the timestamp of the publication, the news categories, the persons, organisations and locations mentioned therein, related articles within the same and across different languages, quotations by and about persons. Additionally, we have data about trends, i.e. whether news related to the same event or subject are increasing or decreasing in numbers over time, and there is some information on sentiment/tonality. This structured collection makes it in principle possible to produce any statistics and to establish any trends related to these types of information. For selected subjects and feature combinations, the JRC regularly publishes its analysis, allowing EMM users to have a deeper insight into the publications on subject areas of their interest. In this article, we presented a range of different types of analyses and visualisations in order to give an overview of distributions and trends observed during large-scale media analysis. Such an extraction and aggregation of data is not usually the final objective, but it normally is the starting point for an intellectual human analysis. Analysts can get inspired by the data, questions may arise, suspicions may get confirmed or contradicted. Used carefully, we believe that the analyses produced by EMM or similar systems can be very useful because they may be used as an inspiration and as empirical evidence for any argument human analysts may want to make. However, we find it extremely important that users be aware of the limitations and of possible pitfalls when using such data, be it from EMM or from other automatic systems: First of all, media monitoring is not reality monitoring. What the media say is not necessarily factually true and media attention towards certain subjects usually differs from the real-life distribution of facts or events, giving media consumers a biased view. Media reporting is heavily influenced by the political or geographical viewpoint of the news source. It is therefore useful to analyse a large, well-balanced set of media sources coming from many different countries world-wide. EMM aims to reach such a balance, but sources are also added on request of users, it is not always known what political standpoints newspapers have, and not all news sources are freely accessible. For this reason, EMM displays the list of media sources so that users can form their own opinion. Any analysis, be it automatic or man-made, is error-prone. This is even true for basic functionalities such as the recognition of person names in documents and the categorisation of texts according to subject domains. Machines might make simple mistakes easily spottable by human analysts, such as categorising an article as being about the outbreak of communicable diseases when category-defining words such as tuberculosis are found in articles discussing a new song produced by a famous music producer, which is easily spottable by a person. On the other hand, machines are better at going through very large document collections and they are very consistent in their categorisation while people suffer from inconsistency and they tend to generalise on the basis of the small document collection they have read. For these reasons, it is crucial that any summaries, trend visualisations or other analyses can be verified by the human analysts. Users should be able to verify the data by drilling down, e.g. viewing the original text data in the case of peaks or unexpected developments, and especially to get an intuitive confidence measure by viewing a number of cases that lead to conclusions. Most of EMM's graphs are interactive and allow viewing the underlying data. It would be useful if system providers additionally offered confidence values regarding the accuracy of their analyses. For EMM, most specialised applications on individual information extraction tools include such tool evaluation results and an error analysis (e.g. XXX-REF). However, the tools can behave very differently depending on the text type and the language, making the availability of drill-down functionality indispensable. End users should be careful with accuracy statistics given by system providers. Especially commercial vendors (but not only) are good at presenting their systems in a very positive light. For instance, our experience has shown that, especially in the field of sentiment analysis (opinion mining, tonality), high accuracy is difficult to achieve even when the statistical accuracy measurement Precision and Recall are high. Overall Precision (accuracy for the system's predictions) may for instance indeed be high when considering predictions for positive, negative and neutral sentiment, but this might simply be because the majority class (e.g. neutral) is very large and the system is good at spotting this. Accuracy statistics may also have been produced on an easy-to-analyse dataset while the data at hand may be harder to analyse. Sentiment, for instance, may be easier to detect on product review pages on vending sites such as Amazon than on the news because journalists tend to want to give the impression of neutrality. Machine learning approaches to text analysis are particularly promising because computers are good at optimising evidence and because machine learning tools are cheap to produce, compared to man-made rules. However, the danger is that the automatically learnt rules are applied to texts that are different from the training data as comparable data rarely exists. Manually produced rules might be easier to tune and to adapt. Again, statistics on the performance of automatic tools should be considered with care. Within EMM, machine learning is used to learn vocabulary and recognition patterns, but these are then usually manually verified and generalised (e.g. Zavarella et al. 2010; Tanev & Magnini 2008). To summarise: we firmly believe that Automated Content Analysis works when it is used with care and when its strengths and limits are known. Computers and people have different strengths which – in combination – can be very powerful as they combine large-scale evidence gathering with the intelligence of human judgement. References Atkinson M, Keim D, Schaefer M, Franz W, Leitner-Fischer F, Zintgraf F. (2010). DYNEVI - DYnamic News Entity VIsualization. In: J.Kohlhammer, D.Keim (eds). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology. Golsar (Germany): The Eurographics Association. pp. 69-74 . 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Semi-automatic acquisition of lexical resources and grammars for event extraction in Bulgarian and Czech. Proceedings of the 4th Biennial International Workshop on Balto-Slavic Natural Language Processing, held at ACL'2013, pp. 110-118. Tanev Hristo (2007). Unsupervised Learning of Social Networks from a Multiple-Source News Corpus. Proceedings of the Workshop Multi-source Multilingual Information Extraction and Summarization (MMIES'2007) held at RANLP'2007, pp. 33-40. Borovets, Bulgaria, 26 September 2007. Tanev Hristo, Bruno Pouliquen, Vanni Zavarella & Ralf Steinberger (2010). Automatic Expansion of a Social Network Using Sentiment Analysis. In: Nasrullah Memon, Jennifer Jie Xu, David Hicks & Hsinchun Chen (eds). Annals of Information Systems, Volume 12. Special Issue on Data Mining for Social Network Data, pp. 9-29. Springer Science and Business Media (DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-6287-4_2). Tanev Hristo, Jakub Piskorski & Martin Atkinson (2008). Real-time News Event Extraction for Global Crisis Monitoring. In V. Sugumaran, M. Spiliopoulou, E. Kapetanios (editors) Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Applications of Natural Language to Information Systems (NLDB 2008 ), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Cool. 5039, 24-27 June, London, UK. Tanev Hristo, Maud Ehrmann, Jakub Piskorski & Vanni Zavarella (2012). Enhancing Event Descriptions through Twitter Mining. In: AAAI Publications, Sixth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media, pp 587-590. Dublin, June 2012. Tanev Hristo, Vanni Zavarella, Jens Linge, Mijail Kabadjov, Jakub Piskorski, Martin Atkinson & Ralf Steinberger (2009). Exploiting Machine Learning Techniques to Build an Event Extraction System for Portuguese and Spanish. In: linguaMÁTICA Journal:2, pp. 55-66. Available at: . Turchi Marco, Martin Atkinson, Alastair Wilcox, Brett Crawley, Stefano Bucci, Ralf Steinberger & Erik van der Goot (2012). ONTS: "OPTIMA" News Translation System. Proceedings of the 13th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (EACL), pp. 25–30, Avignon, France, April 23 - 27 2012. Van der Goot Erik, Hristo Tanev & Jens Linge (2013). Combining twitter and media reports on public health events in MedISys. Proceedings of the 22nd international conference on World Wide Web companion, pp. 703-718. International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, 2013. Zavarella Vanni, Hristo Tanev, Jens Linge, Jakub Piskorski, Martin Atkinson & Ralf Steinberger (2010). Exploiting Multilingual Grammars and Machine Learning Techniques to Build an Event Extraction System for Portuguese. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Computational Processing of Portuguese Language (PROPOR'2010), Porto Alegre, Brazil, 27-30 April 2010. Springer Lecture Notes for Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 6001, pp. 21-24. Springer. Observing Trends in Automated Multilingual Media Analysis Authors: Ralf, Aldo, Alexandra, Guillaume, Hristo, Martin, Michele, Yaniv, Erik European Commission – Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra (VA), Italy e-mail: Ralf.Steinberger@jrc.ec.europa.eu ( corresponding author )
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Seeking Work | Business Projects | VBA Programming | 2019 Jul IT and Business Concept-To-Execution Project and Product Management Professional Seeking Contract or Full Time Work in New York City or Remotely.
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The H boson gateway to physics beyond the Standard Model Welcome to the be.h web page. This project is funded by the Belgian EOS programme. It is a collaboration between Université catholique de Louvain, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Universiteit Gent, Universiteit Antwerpen and Université Libre de Bruxelles. Internal documents for the network members.  
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The Facilitation Starter Learn the basics of designing, preparing and facilitating a collaboration workshop. For aspiring internal facilitators, ''intrapreneurs'', designers and disruptors. Think of us like your facilitation personal trainers!
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Janet Smith Warfield | SHIFT Change Your Words, Change Your World The peak of Volcan Baru, western Panama's dormant volcano, loomed majestically out of the clouds in the early dawn as I pulled a card from my friend Donna
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talegence - talent intelligence talegence is talent intelligence! Not just a talent management system but a strategic talent leadership system that is business driven and fully integrated.
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AMPWORK AMPWork introduces better and less expensive products and technologies, employ better business models, and are faster and more flexible in everything it does. At AMPWork we believe in the power of work.
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testimonialAsset 1 We offer the #1 employee communications app for mobile workplace collaboration. Reach your entire workforce with all the employee engagement tools you need in one internal communications platform. Optimized for non-desk workers, Beekeeper’s digital workplace app integrates multiple operational systems and communication channels in one secure hub that is accessible from desktop and mobile devices. Our software is trusted by business leaders in over 130 countries!
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BlogIn - Create and run an internal company blog! Share internal news and knowledge, boost team collaboration and improve overall internal communication. Start 14 day FREE trial!
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TheEmployable | The online community by the employable for the employable. The ultimate resource for tips, advice, guidance and support on all things relating to job-seeking, careers and lifestyle choices.
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Wipster: Secure Video Feedback Media and post-production professionals rely on Wipster for faster creative collaboration and review across clients and internal teams
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Brandon Standerfer Hospitality Consultant With a keen focus on developing cohesive synergies through system integration requires an approach with core principles; strategy, project management and optimization. The hotel distribution technology landscape has layers of technology connecting to the previous layer. The distribution services provided are focused on the Internal Property Management Systems, Distribution Tools and Aggregation platforms. Solid management experience spanning multiple disciplines including Revenue Management and Distribution Optimization, Project Management, Call Center Operations, Reservation Sales and Process Improvement. Collaboration has no limits, therefore conquering the hospitality distribution technology landscape demands contribution from all disciplines of the hotel executive team. Let’s spend time together customizing distribution services to overcome current obstacles to deliver increased revenues.
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Communication & Collaboration Including Distance Learning Training - Collaborate Solutions Collaborate was founded at the inception of virtual collaboration solutions and are the company behind many notable enterprise wide implementations across Education, Government and Corporate markets
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HospitalPORTAL - Complete Hospital Intranet / Employee Portal Solution HospitalPORTAL Intranet CMS is a hospital and healthcare specific intranet portal system for developing internal sites that engage staff by delivering quick & easy access to important information, collaboration, and policy and procedure management.
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ClioSoft Inc. - Leader in SoC Design Data and IP Management Solutions ClioSoft is the pioneer and leading developer of enterprise system-on-chip (SoC) design configuration and enterprise IP management solutions for the semiconductor industry. The company provides two unique platforms that enable IP design management and reuse. The SOS7 platform is the only design management solution for multi-site design collaboration for all types of designs – analog, digital, RF and mixed-signal and the designHUB platform provides a collaborative IP reuse ecosystem for enterprises. ClioSoft customers include the top 20 semiconductor companies worldwide. The company is headquartered in Fremont, CA with sales offices and distributors in the United States, United Kingdom, Europe, Israel, India, China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan. For more information visit www.cliosoft.com. The designHUB platform provides a collaborative IP reuse ecosystem for enterprises to leverage their internal and 3rd party IPs for faster SoC development cycles. With built-in collaborative tools to enable IP/SoC development, designHUB improves IP reuse by providing an easy-to-use workflow for designers to browse, download, integrate, and publish IPs securely. The designHUB platform enables design teams to succeed by providing them with a secure collaborative platform to share, communicate, discuss and collate all project related activities on a dashboard. Enabling designers to be more productive, designHUB tracks the entire design project and displays the notifications and tasks assigned in an easy to review dashboard. designHUB works on top of physical NAS devices as well as design management systems such as SOS, Subversion, Git and Perforce and is integrated with commonly used issue-tracking systems. ClioSoft’s SOS7 design management platform empowers single or multi-site design teams to collaborate efficiently on complex analog, digital, RF and mixed-signal designs from concept to GDSII within a secure design environment. Tight integration with tools from various EDA vendors, along with an emphasis on performance for data transfer, security and disk space optimization provides a cohesive design environment that enables design teams to streamline development for all types of digital, analog, RF and mixed-signal SoCs. In addition to enabling design engineers to securely manage design data and tool features from the same cockpit, SOS7 provides integrated revision control, release and derivative management and issue-tracking interface to commonly used bug-tracking systems. Using SOS7 facilitates easy design handoffs between teams and mitigates the possibility of design re-spins.
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Centre for Sustainable Communities - Centre for Sustainable Communities The Centre for Sustainable Communities (CSC) is part of the Office of the Vice-Chancellor at the University of Hertfordshire. Specialising in sustainable energy, sustainable transport and sustainable planning. Bringing together key elements needed to form and support sustainable communities into the future. Planning & Urbanism, Sustainable Transport and the Environment - the CSC works in collaboration with both internal and external partners to deliver funded projects, academic and professional development programmes, as well as undertake research. The CSC hosts Seminars and Conferences, engaging leading thinkers to stimulate debate and promote ideas.
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Triptik Management | Home TripTik Management was founded in 2010 by Will Gresford, Holly Lintell and Ed Howard to manage Songwriters, Producers and Artists. Collectively drawing on over 30 years of experience across the music industry including Music Publishing, Production and Writing, Producer and Artist Management, Major-label A&R, Synchronisation and Touring for key companies and individuals such as Xenomania, Z-Management, ROAR Global, Distiller, Paul Gambaccini, Sony/ATV and Asylum Records. TripTik pools knowledge and experience to offer a comprehensive service to a diverse roster in a rapidly changing industry. The diverse client roster in turn enables TripTik to exploit the widest range of opportunities – key to success in the modern music industry – with an emphasis on internal collaboration and support.
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Texas Open Innovation Conference For the past three years, Lone Star College has hosted Innovation Week, which has seen countless ideas come to the forefront of development through open innovation. Its success demonstrates that now is the time to drive collaboration. Enter: the Texas Open Innovation Conference. “To have a great idea, have a lot of them.” – Thomas Edison The Conference will take place on March 29th and 30th in Houston, Texas. Business, government, and academia will come together to exchange knowledge and advance technology and ideas. Texas ranks among the top performing states on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Enterprising States: States Innovate study This two-day event will feature innovation experts from across the country. Academics, business leaders, and industry professionals will have a creative platform to consider new ways of sourcing ideas and translating them into groundbreaking industry solutions. The Texas Open Innovation Conference is your chance to be part of a forum for models of collaboration and partnerships. “Open innovation works best when you have people collaborating side by side, with people that are moving from one organization to another.” – Professor Henry Chesbrough Join us as we explore fascinating theoretical presentations, valuable real-world case studies, and interactive panel discussions from across the industry spectrum. WHAT TO EXPECT 200+ attendees 20+ sessions and 30+ speakers Networking opportunities with companies across multiple industries Case studies, panel discussions and roundtable sessions on open innovation best practices What you can expect: Presentations on successful cross-industry collaborations and partnerships Frameworks for establishing an internal culture that values Open Innovation Tactics to inform the business case for Open Innovation and get stakeholder buy-in Interactive panel discussions on moving from incremental innovation to disruptive innovation
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HipPocket | Transforming real estate agent communication HipPocket is a communications platform with a suite of products for Real Estate Agents, Brokerages and Realtor Association communities.
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MultiUx: software and services for Unified Communications solutions The brand MultiUx is a family composed of software and services for Unified Communications solutions, designed for Skype for Business, Office 365, and more.
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Social Intranet for G Suite - Happeo The digital workplace and social intranet software, built for Google G Suite. Happeo is a Google technology partner, and have built the social intranet exclusively for G Suite users. Boost your internal communications, and empower collaboration, productivity and bright ideas within your workplace.
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Icon For Arrow-up Mongrov, the best team communication app & online collaboration platform, comes with group messaging, group video conference, task management and other great features that improve productivity and boost speed of execution.
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GEVCO – Global Electric Vehicle Company (supported by UK Trade & Investment) GEVCO, led by a highly experienced e-automotive team is coordinating the development of a major international collaboration to bring to market a new generation of Electric Vehicles (supported by UK Trade & Investment). The Vision is a series of electric vehicle platforms with multiple applications that will successfully compete on quality, safety and price with Internal Combustion powered vehicles in International markets.
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Intelligent Workflow System | AMODIT Rapid workflow implementation with use of AI. Workflow processes templates for expense report approvals,payment approvals,purchase orders,purchase requisitions,travel expense approvals,PTO approvals,employee onboarding processes,internal collaboration,archiving documents.
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Signal Kit - Smart tools. Effective Communication. Signal Kit is the complete communication suite for your K-12 community: cloud-based mass communication, internal collaboration and oversight.
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myrenewables – A site to share the most interesting news in the renewables space that I come across…..plus a few eclectic ones A site to share the most interesting news in the renewables space that I come across.....plus a few eclectic ones
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The Islamic State Archives – In Collaboration With Jihadology This website is a collaboration between Aymenn Jawad al-Tamimi and Aaron Y. Zelin from Jihadology. It provides an extensive archive of internal Islamic State documents, which are different from its propaganda materials. This front page will highlight recently added documents to the archive, while also featuring interesting pieces of note. Featured Documents: The Internal Structure…