RAW RANKED SITES ABOUT
#3 QUICK TAKES

The most comprehensive list of 3 quick takes websites last updated on Feb 1 2021.
Stats collected from various trackers included with free apps.
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Lansing State Journal - Home Lansing Michigan News - lansingstatejournal.com is the home page of Lansing Michigan with in depth and updated Lansing local news. Stay informed with both Lansing Michigan news as well as headlines and stories from around the world.
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Good Leadership Skills - Character - Integrity - Courage Good leadership skills require good character, integrity, and courage. Some can be improved upon yet others come from within!
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Tech Zone 24 – Just another WordPress site While browsing the internet I came accross an amazing article from Semrush that I would like to share with you. If you enjoy this article then you can visit the original article using the link to the bottom of this page. You’ve heard people telling you that you need to write in-depth content because that’s what Google wants. And it’s true… the average page that ranks on page 1 of Google contains 1,890 words. But you already know that. The question is, should you be writing 2,000-word articles? 5,000? Or maybe even go crazy and create ultimate guides that are 30,000 words? What’s funny is, I have done it all. I’ve even tested out adding custom images and illustrations to these in-depth articles to see if that helps. And of course, I tested if having one super long page with tens of thousands of words or having multiple pages with 4,000 or 5,000 words is better. So, what do you think? How in-depth should your content be? Well, let’s first look at my first marketing blog, Quick Sprout. Short articles don’t rank well With Quick Sprout, it started off just like any normal blog. I would write 500 to 1,000-word blog posts and Google loved me. Just look at my traffic during January 2011. As you can see, I had a whopping 67,038 unique visitors. That’s not too bad. Even with the content being short, it did fairly well on Google over the years. But over time, more marketing blogs started to pop up, competition increased, and I had no choice but to write more detailed content. I started writing posts that were anywhere from 1,000 to a few thousand words. When I started to do that, I was able to rapidly grow my traffic from 67,038 to 115,759 in one year. That’s a 72.67% increase in traffic in just 1 year. It was one of my best years, and all I had to do was write longer content. So naturally, I kept up with the trend and continually focused on longer content. But as the competition kept increasing, my traffic started to stagnate, even though I was producing in-depth content. Here are my traffic stats for November 2012 on Quick Sprout. I understand that Thanksgiving takes place in November, hence traffic wasn’t as high as it could be. But still, there really wasn’t any growth from January to November of 2012. In other words, writing in-depth content that was a few thousand words max wasn’t working out. So what next? Well, my traffic had plateaued. I had to figure something else out. Writing longer, more in-depth content had helped me before… so I thought, why not try the 10x formula. I decided to create content 10 times longer, better, and more in-depth than everyone else. I was going to the extreme because I knew it would reduce the chance of others copying me. Plus, I was hoping that you would love it as a reader. So, on January 24, 2013, I released my first in-depth guide. It was called The Advanced Guide to SEO. It was so in-depth that it could have been a book. Literally! Heck, some say it was even better than a book as I paid someone for custom illustration work. Now let’s look at the traffic stats for January 2013 when I published the guide. As you can see my traffic really started to climb again. I went from 112,681 visitors in November to 244,923 visitors in January. Within 2 months I grew my traffic by 117%. That’s crazy!!!! The only difference: I was creating content that was so in-depth that no one else dared to copy to me (at that time). Sure, some tried and a few were able to create some great content, but it wasn’t like hundreds of competing in-depth guides were coming out each year. Not even close! Now, when I published the guide I broke it down into multiple chapters like a book because when I tested out making it one long page, it loaded so slow that the user experience was terrible. Nonetheless, the strategy was effective. So what did I do next? I created 12 in-depth guides I partnered up with other marketers and created over 280,000 words of marketing content. I picked every major subject… from online marketing to landing pages to growth hacking. I did whatever I could to generate the most traffic within the digital marketing space. It took a lot of time and money to create all 12 of these guides, but it was worth it. By January of 2014, my traffic had reached all-time highs. I was generating 378,434 visitors a month. That’s a lot for a personal blog on marketing. Heck, that’s a lot for any blog. In other words, writing 10x content that was super in-depth worked really well. Even when I stopped producing guides, my traffic, continually rose. Here’s my traffic in January 2015: And here’s January 2016 for Quick Sprout: But over time something happened. My traffic didn’t keep growing. And it didn’t stay flat either… it started to drop. In 2017, my traffic dropped for the first time. It went from 518,068 monthly visitors to 451,485. It wasn’t a huge drop, but it was a drop. And in 2018 my traffic dropped even more: I saw a huge drop in 2018. Traffic went down to just 297,251 monthly visitors. And sure, part of that is because I shifted my focus to NeilPatel.com, which has become the main place I blog now. But it’s largely that I learned something new when building up NeilPatel.com. Longer isn’t always better Similar to Quick Sprout, I have in-depth guides on NeilPatel.com. I have guides on online marketing, SEO, Google ads, Facebook ads, and the list goes on and on. If you happened to click on any of the guides above you’ll notice that they are drastically different than the ones on Quick Sprout. Here are the main differences: No fancy design – I found with the Quick Sprout experience, people love the fancy designs, but over time content gets old and outdated. To update content when there are so many custom illustrations is tough, which means you probably won’t update it as often as you should. This causes traffic to go down over time because people want to read up-to-date and relevant information. Shorter and to the point – I’ve found that you don’t need super in-depth content. The guides on NeilPatel.com rank in similar positions on Google and cap out at around 10,000 words. They are still in-depth, but I found that after 10,000 or so words there are diminishing returns. Now let’s look at the stats. Here’s the traffic to the advanced SEO guide on Quick Sprout over the last 30 days: Over 7,842 unique pageviews. There are tons of chapters and as you can see people are going through all of them. And now let’s look at the NeilPatel.com SEO guide: I spent a lot less time, energy, and money creating the guide on NeilPatel.com, yet it receives 17,442 unique pageviews per month, which is more than the Quick Sprout guide. That’s a 122% difference! But how is that possible? I know what you are thinking. Google wants people to create higher quality content that benefits people. So how is it that the NeilPatel.com one ranks higher. Is it because of backlinks? Well, the guide on Quick Sprout has 850 referring domains: And the NeilPatel.com has 831 referring domains: Plus, they have similar URL ratings and domain ratings according to Ahrefs so that can’t be it. So, what gives? Google is a machine. It doesn’t think with emotions, it uses logic. While we as a user look at the guide on Quick Sprout and think that it looks better and is more in-depth, Google focuses on the facts. See, Google doesn’t determine if one article is better than another by asking people for their opinion. Instead, they look at the data. For example, they can look at the following metrics: Time on site – which content piece has a better time on site? Bounce rate – which content piece has the lowest bounce rate? Back button – does the article solve all of the visitors’ questions and concerns? So much so they visitor doesn’t have to hit the back button and go back to Google to find another web page? And those are just a few things that Google looks at from their 200+ ranking factors. Because of this, I took a different approach to NeilPatel.com, which is why my traffic has continually gone up over time. Instead of using opinion and spending tons of energy creating content that I think is amazing, I decided to let Google guide me. With NeilPatel.com, my articles range from 2,000 to 3,000 words. I’ve tried articles with 5,000+ words, but there is no guarantee that the more in-depth content will generate more traffic or that users will love it. Now to clarify, I’m not trying to be lazy. Instead, I’m trying to create amazing content while being short and to the point. I want to be efficient with both my time and your time while still delivering immense value. Here’s the process I use to ensure I am not writing tons of content that people don’t want to read. Be data driven Because there is no guarantee that an article or blog post will do well, I focus on writing amazing content that is 2,000 to 3,000-words long. I stick within that region because it is short enough where you will read it and long enough that I can go in-depth enough to provide value. Once I release a handful of articles, I then look to see which ones you prefer based on social shares and search traffic. Now that I have a list of articles that are doing somewhat well, I log into Google Search Console and find those URLs. You can find a list of URLs within Google Search Console by clicking on “Search Traffic” and then “Search Analytics”. You’ll see a screen load that looks something like this: From there you’ll want to click on the “pages” button. You should be looking at a screen that looks similar to this: Find the pages that are gaining traction based on total search traffic and social shares and then click on them (you can input URLs into Shared Count to find out social sharing data). Once you click on the URL, you’ll want to select the “Queries” icon to see which search terms people are finding that article from. Now go back to your article and make it more in-depth. And when I say in-depth, I am not talking about word count like I used to focus on at Quick Sprout. Instead, I am talking depth… did the article cover everything that the user was looking for? If you can cover everything in 3,000 words then you are good. If not, you’ll have to make it longer. The way you do this is by seeing which search queries people are using to find your articles (like in the screenshot above). Keep in mind that people aren’t searching Google in a deliberate effort to land on your site… people use Google because they are looking for a solution to their problem. Think of those queries that Google Search Console is showing you as “questions” people have. If your article is in-depth enough to answer all of those questions, then you have done a good job. If not, you’ll have to go more in-depth. In essence, you are adding more words to your article, but you aren’t adding fluff. You’re not keyword stuffing either. You are simply making sure to cover all aspects of the subject within your article. This is how you write in-depth articles and not waste your time (or money) on word count. And that’s how I grew NeilPatel.com without writing too many unnecessary words. Conclusion If you are writing 10,000-word articles you are wasting your time. Heck, even articles over 5,000 words could be wasting your time if you are only going after as many words as possible and adding tons of fluff along the way. You don’t know what people want to read. You’re just taking a guess. The best approach is to write content that is amazing and within the 2,000 word to 3,000-word range. Once you publish the content, give it a few months and then look at search traffic as well as social sharing data to see what people love. Take those articles and invest more resources into making them better and ultimately more in-depth (in terms of quality and information, not word count). The last thing you want to do is write in-depth articles on subjects that very few people care about. Just look at the Advanced Guide to SEO on Quick Sprout… I made an obvious mistake. I made it super in-depth on “advanced SEO”. But when you search Google for the term “SEO” and you scroll to the bottom to see related queries you see this… People are looking for the basics of SEO, not advanced SEO information. In Conclusion If you would certainly such as to check out even more short articles on search engine optimization after that feel cost-free to search our various other articles. We have many more curated write-ups from semrush as well as I wish you delight in reading them. link to original source
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The Conservative Income Investor | Aside from the usual recommendations to own companies with dominant market positions, strong balance sheets, and high earnings growth, what is something that investors should keep in mind over the next 20+ years of investing that maybe didn't matter as much in the past? My view is that investors should be taking to heart the 1970s recommendations of Peter Drucker who predicted that one of the endings of perpetual technological development is that friction will cease to exist between the original source of a product and the consumer. This means that you should be wary about investing in companies that act as middlemen. Take something like Dick's Sporting Goods (DKS). It's a $5.3 billion company that is divided into 114 million pieces that trade at $47 per share each. It earns a profit of $350 million, or $3.07 per share. The valuation of 15x earnings is pretty low for a company that has ten-year top-line growth of 11.5%, ten-year earnings per share growth of 16.5%, and a valuation of 19-23x earnings during that time. Since the $3 per share IPO in October 2002, the stock has grown a $10,000 investment into $151,000 in just fourteen years. That is especially impressive when you consider that the current valuation of the stock is competitive with the recession-level P/E ratio level and is otherwise the cheapest opportunity to buy Dick's Sporting Goods since the IPO. Yet, when I study Dick's Sporting Goods, there is a limitation on the type of way it should be considered. It's not something like General Electric, Coca-Cola, Colgate-Palmolive, Nestle, or Brown Forman where you can buy the shares, and then set it and collect the dividends for the rest of your life knowing with a high probability that something will be there decades from now. There will come an expiration date for the company because the original source goods--the Nike and Under Armour products that get customers through the door--are now beginning to contact customers directly without the need for a vendor middleman like Dick's Sporting Goods to act as an intermediary to connect Nike shoes and golf clubs to the consumer. At first, I noticed that Nike and Under Armour were beginning to sell their own products directly to consumers online. That was something that would compete with Dick's Sporting Goods, but not necessarily in a mutually exclusive way--it is conceivable to think of a world where Nike and Under Armour's online sales grow while Dick's Sporting Goods also earns a tidy growing profit selling those goods to customers as well. That's because shoes, jackets, shirts, pants, and so on are the type of good you like to see firsthand and get a feel for--it's distinguishable from buying a book on Amazon because there is a certain in-person customization that enough customers will require. But what has bothered me, from the perspective of someone studying the business model at Dick's Sporting Goods, is that Nike and Under Armour have successfully opened their open stores that sell their products directly to consumers. If there is a pair of Nike shoes that you want, why not just go to Nike instead of an intermediary that will have to raise the price enough to own their own keep as well? The coherence of the intermediary's business model takes on a substantial impairment when the end products that a customer desires can be purchased through the end company itself. There are three reasons why a business earns a profit over the long term. You may buy something because it is cheap, you may buy something because it is convenient, and you may buy something because you want the specific product itself. An example of the first category is airlines--unless you belong to a frequent flyer program, you will choose which airline to travel based on price. If Delta tickets cost $139, and Southwest tickets cost $129, you're going to choose Southwest unless there is some other externality weighing on your decision--e.g. maybe you had a bad experience flying Southwest before, maybe the Delta routes are more timely, etc. Absent an intervening externality, price wins out. Convenience is the second moat, and this is the weakest of them all. You might frequent a grocery store because it's by your house--you wouldn't actively choose it based on price, and you don't seek out the grocery store for it's own sake, but it's only a five minute drive away so you go there anyway. And the third type of business is the strongest--when you want the specific product itself. You don't just want shoes--you want Nike shoes. You don't just want soda--you want something sold through Coca-Cola, Pepsi, or Dr. Pepper. You don't just want acetaminophen--you want Johnson & Johnson's Tylenol. Using our Dick's Sporting Goods example, you can see that the profits are built on convenience. People don't want Nike shoes because they bought them at Dick's Sporting Goods; they buy them at Dick's Sporting Goods because that is the most convenient way to get Nike shoes with the immediate knowledge that they fit. This is the type of business model that is the most vulnerable to disruption. It doesn't mean that you shouldn't buy Dick's Sporting Goods--the current price around $47 per share does offer some protection, but it's the kind of company that you may not want to hold beyond five years. A quick 40% pop, or the spotting of a branded company with a similar valuation to Dick's, is enough justification to get out of the company because firms built on convenience exclusively are not inherently meant to be lifetime holdings. This observation usually leads to a follow-up like: So what do you do if you own Wal-Mart stock? There are three things that Wal-Mart has going for it that might distinguish from an investment in a firm like Dick's Sporting Goods. It sells products that don't face competition from the branded source; it has the additional benefit of cost advantages in addition to convenience advantages; and the firm is 50% owned by the Walton family which reduces the inherent conflict of self-interests that exists in a corporation where there is a disunity between management and shareholders. Although Wal-Mart faces convenient and price competition from Amazon, and in some instances, Aldi and Kroger, it still offers enough of a price advantage on a decent number of offerings that it may be the preferred choice of customers not only because it is close by but also because you want to see the oranges and bananas before you buy them and there's probably not a better price if you look elsewhere either. The Wal-Mart business model isn't just built on convenience; it's built on the mixture of cost and convenience. Also, anytime you buy stock in a company, you also face the disadvantage of not fully knowing what's going on inside the company. When you buy a few hundred or a few thousand shares of a billion-dollar corporation, you can't quite measure the management team's survivalist instinct and know the specifics of how that instinct (if it exists) translates into a sound strategy that will serve shareholders well. With the Walton family collectively owning over $100 billion of the company's $214 billion in market value, you can strongly presume that the survivalist instinct exists at the management level (because the Walton family's control of the board permits them to choose officers) so the only unknown is whether the survivalist instinct translates into a strategy that permits shareholders to prosper. It's one set of unknowns instead of a double set of unknowns. The most straightforward way to solve this problem--recognizing that Wal-Mart has a strong cost and convenience advantage but unsure whether it is built to withstand the decades--is to take your Wal-Mart dividends if Wal-Mart is a meaningful position you hold and then invest them in companies that more clearly have generational-holding characteristics. If the Wal-Mart business model is only meant to grow earnings for 23 more years, well, you get at least 92 dividend payments to mitigate that final outcome. But if you're trying to figure out what should be your investing north star for the next two decades, and have concerns about the rate of disruption brought about by technological change, then you should focus on companies where people seek it out to specifically acquire the products that they sell. Strong brands should be your first priority, and can easily fill two thirds of a portfolio. Then, you focus on the low-cost producers in an industry that have some type of cost advantage--companies with the GEICO, Wells Fargo, U.S. Bancorp, Exxon business model. That can take up anywhere from 10% to 30% of your selections. And lastly, you should aim to keep less than 10% of your wealth that is earmarked for long-term business ownership towards those companies that are exclusively about convenience. Those are the businesses most susceptible to shareholder wipeout, and therefore, should be a disfavored investment category.
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Jets & Props - Aircraft mock-ups Located in North Hollywood, Jets & Props is renown airplane set and props studio. It services both the motion picture and television industry for over twenty years.